Lance Armstrong Confessed Doping During Oprah Interview: REPORT

Lance Armstrong Confessed Doping During Oprah Interview: REPORT
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AP  |  By JIM VERTUNO and JIM LITKE Posted: 01/14/2013 7:16 pm EST  |  Updated: 01/15/2013 9:25 pm EST

reddit stumble Most Popular Cycling Lance Armstrong AUSTIN, Texas -- Lance Armstrong ended a decade of denial by confessing to Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France, a person familiar with the situation told T... AUSTIN, Texas -- Lance Armstrong ended a decade of denial by confessing to Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France, a person familiar with the situation told T... Related News On Huffington Post:  
Lance Armstrong Admitted Doping During Interview, Confirms Oprah Oprah Winfrey On Lance Armstrong: 5 Things Learned Oprah Says Lance Armstrong 'Did Not Come Clean In The Manner' She Expected Lance Armstrong Scoops Oprah With Livestrong Confession Floyd Landis Lawsuit Against Lance Armstrong Could Be Joined By Justice Department: REPORT Lance Armstrong Admits Doping To Oprah: REPORT Sunday Times Takes Out Chicago Tribune Ad Telling Oprah What To Ask Lance Armstrong Lance Armstrong Plans To Confess Doping Throughout Career In Oprah Interview: REPORT

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WASHINGTON (AP) — An attorney familiar with cyclist Lance Armstrong's legal problems said Tuesday that the Justice Department is highly likely to join a whistleblower...

Lance Armstrong Admits Doping To Oprah: REPORT

AUSTIN, Texas — Lance Armstrong confessed to Oprah Winfrey during an interview Monday that he used performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France, a...

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A Sunday Times editor took out an ad in the Chicago Tribune addressing Oprah's upcoming interview with Lance Armstrong. Oprah will sit down with Armstrong...

Lance Armstrong Plans To Confess Doping Throughout Career In Oprah Interview: REPORT

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Lance Armstrong said he will answer questions "directly, honestly and candidly" during an interview with Oprah Winfrey next week. He will... Around the Web:

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Report: Lance Armstrong apologizes but does not confess to doping

AP: Lance Armstrong confesses to Oprah

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Filed by Chris Greenberg  |  More in Sports...
Lance Armstrong's $5 Million Offer Rejected By...NFL Playoffs Key Matchups For Championship SundayChip Kelly Named Eagles New Head CoachWADA: Lance Armstrong Confession To Oprah Is...     Comments 4,993 Pending Comments 7 View FAQ Previewing Your Comment. This comment has not yet been posted You have exceeded your word limit by    words. Please click the "Edit" button and shorten your comment. Post Comment Edit Cancel

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of our newest badge: Community Curator. View All Favorites Bloggers Recency  |  Popularity Page: 1 2 3 4 5  Next ›  Last »  (142 total) TiffanyBubbles 11 Fans 57 seconds ago ( 2:04 PM) Crime pays in America. No one can convince me otherwise. I agree that people make mistakes, but Lance made an "on purpose." He was cunning and mean, mowing down anybody who refused to play along with his egomaniacal lunacy. This dolt deserves to be sued into poverty! TiffanyBubbles: Crime pays in America. No one can convince me otherwise. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/TiffanyBubbles/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222396403.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… ajmediator 14 Fans 2 hours ago (11:42 AM) Where's the law against reinjecting your own blood? Granted it's against sports rules but that doesn't mean Lance has exposure in court. The court of opinion has trashed the man, maybe justifiably but don't believe the barrage of hyperbole by the media as to Lance's financial exposure to the world. The man is brilliant and has a legal team of junk-yard-dog attorneys who've advised him when/how/what to say in the Opra interview. He still is one of the most incredible athletes in the world despite this major smudge on his rep. ajmediator: Where's the law against reinjecting your own blood? Granted it's http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/ajmediator/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222335981.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… starmarine05 20 Fans 6 hours ago ( 8:22 AM) Lance IS still the MAN! 7 Tour titles! Most all are guilty - SO WHAT? Keep your chin up, Lance. You are still the BEST pro cyclist EVER! Even battling cancer, you slaughtered the Euros - that's what counts. Plus, you've raised 100's of millions of $ for cancer awareness/research... No one can take that away. Too bad your jealous, ne're-do-well teammates ratted you out... They are just as guilty - even after you made them wealthy, they turn into snitches. ...But where is the proof? Where are all of the pee/blood tests that prove you are/were guilty? You were convicted by the words of lesser men.... That SUCKS! ...Rock on Lance, I still love you man! starmarine05: Lance IS still the MAN! 7 Tour titles! Most all http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/starmarine05/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222277836.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program used2b2 Only on the side of truth 76 Fans 8 hours ago ( 6:17 AM) I hope that an apology without actually admitting doping isn't all this Narcissist has to pay. The scope of his lies has been so far reaching that "An Apology" just doesn't seem to fit the crime. I doubt it's really sincere to begin with other than him feeling bad for himself. used2b2: I hope that an apology without actually admitting doping isn't http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/used2b2/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222262544.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… Irkitated 14 Fans   9 hours ago ( 5:35 AM) His career has gone down faster and harder than an intern during the Clinton administration. Have a read of my take on why we shouldn't be soft on him http://www.irkitated.blogspot.com.au/#!http://irkitated.blogspot.com/2013/01/lance-armstrong-admits-is-drug-cheat.html Irkitated: His career has gone down faster and harder than an http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/Irkitated/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222259265.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… Randolph Rope 11 Fans 9 hours ago ( 5:17 AM) I am not so upset about him proving the reach of mans endurance and ability in winning 7 "Riding around Frances" as I am about what this says about 'a' mans determination to win at all costs. Honesty. Integrity. Value of self. Sadly instead of a hero who defied all the odds, we have a lesser person because of it. We look at ourselves, as we should. And to those around us who may still be deceiving our confidence.
It calls into question everything he has said . . . How pervasive was his win over cancer? that has to be addressed . . . Randolph_Rope: I am not so upset about him proving the reach http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/Randolph_Rope/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222257938.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… robinmt4 39 Fans 9 hours ago ( 5:01 AM) ":Livestrong"? Rather an odd name considering the short- and long-term effects of steroid use. Thinning of bones to the point of spontaneous breaks just from getting out of a chair or walking, cancer of the liver--a horrible cancer with poor survival rater--serious mental health problems from depression and anger management issues to outright psychosis--more than a few have committed horrible acts while experiencing "roid rage" and many loved ones abused.

Yep, really living "strong". So whether or not there are potential economic benefits--the mythical pot of gold at the end of the steroid rainbow for the vast majority of hopeful athletes who justify destroying their bodies and relationships with "everyone is doing it so I have to also"--the cost in human suffering that is not confined to the user alone is FAR too high. This is a huge reason why they should NEVER legalize such behavior and why more than a slap on the wrist should await any who attempt such cheating, or coerce others into such destruction.

Other means of cheating are not tolerated so why should this, as some pesimistically assert? No one risks cancer, death, or mental illness by breaking rules like, for example, paying someone else to run the middle of a marathon, or dropping a golf ball on the course when no one can see, yet such behavior would NEVER be considered justified & the cheater would be justifiably kicked out of competition--drugging is so much worse.. robinmt4: ":Livestrong"? Rather an odd name considering the short- and long-term http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/robinmt4/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222256879.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… HUFFPOST SUPER USER HelloAndrew Songwriter, Humorist, Writer, Activist 120 Fans   10 hours ago ( 4:23 AM) Dear apparently shocked human race:

Welcome to planet obvious. I see you are fashionably late to the blatantly glaringly obvious for decades reality party, but welcome! The party is, apparently, just getting started.

Sigh. Why are people so gullible? I and everyone I've talked to about this never believed him for one second ever. But it seems we are the few weirdos who saw the elephantine cancerous testes in the living room were wearing no clothes.
Sigh. HelloAndrew: Dear apparently shocked human race: Welcome to planet obvious. I http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/HelloAndrew/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222254545.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program agness nutter What fresh hell is this? 675 Fans 12 hours ago ( 2:11 AM) So, allegedly, the great man is prepared to testify against others. He will keep most of his 100 million, write a book like Tyler Hamilton, and they can all go pound salt - like the Spanish rider he turned in to the UCI who is now a long distance truck driver. He may have put the nail in the coffin for cycling in the Olympics. Heckuvajob, Lance. agness_nutter: So, allegedly, the great man is prepared to testify against http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/agness_nutter/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222244530.html History  | Permalink  | Share it sun3kar 0 Fans 12 hours ago ( 2:23 AM) well said... sun3kar: well said... http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/sun3kar/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222245708.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… Jocelynn Owen 0 Fans 13 hours ago (12:46 AM) For me this story is a statement regarding the culture clash between reality and fantasy. Being a hero is part timing and the other part persistence. We all are dependent on something or someone in life. Winning is good. Playing with in rules is good. There is always someone that cheats to win because that person or group knows they will loose otherwise. Cancer research is lab work. Science is not a sport. There are no flashy TV, scifi effects, easter eggs, neon lights about it. It sounds good on paper like this: We saved the Trees (instead of making profit on all of them, we left 2 standing) so therefore we are HEROES...So the lab report here reads. Lance Armstrong survives cancer. X people die of cancer and drug abuses. not good Jocelynn_Owen: For me this story is a statement regarding the culture http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/Jocelynn_Owen/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222234202.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… Amb1672 0 Fans 16 hours ago (10:25 PM) The news has been reporting everyday for the past week or so about Lance Armstrong's confession. Was this more of a publicity thing or was he just waiting to see who would pay more for his story? Disappointing? Yes. Shocking? No. Greedy? You bet. Millions would have been satisfied with one win. Seven wins in a row was just being greedy if all along he knew he wasn't being honest about it. Amb1672: The news has been reporting everyday for the past week http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/Amb1672/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222207154.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… EnGardest 0 Fans 16 hours ago ( 9:45 PM) What a sacrificial bait and switch. Don't look at the politicians or bankers. Look over here.
This guy rides a bike. Priorities, man. EnGardest: What a sacrificial bait and switch. Don't look at the http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/EnGardest/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222197284.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program PatA Why does it always have to end up this way? 2137 Fans 15 hours ago (11:08 PM) He started the buzz in Austin years ago about running for governor. Swore he would live in governor's mansion. PatA: He started the buzz in Austin years ago about running http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/PatA/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222216957.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program agness nutter What fresh hell is this? 675 Fans 12 hours ago ( 2:13 AM) Yeah, if ever there was a victim, it's Lance. The guy rides a bike and destroys a sport and anyone who stands in his way. Poor man. agness_nutter: Yeah, if ever there was a victim, it's Lance. The http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/agness_nutter/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222244664.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… HUFFPOST SUPER USER cityman123 226 Fans 17 hours ago ( 8:55 PM) Finally a confession we can believe, now, Mr. Armstrong just go away, you are a national embarrassment. cityman123: Finally a confession we can believe, now, Mr. Armstrong just http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/cityman123/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222184310.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… HUFFPOST SUPER USER dimag56in41 24 Fans 19 hours ago ( 7:15 PM) I guess what really bugs me about issues like this with Lance, and all those Baseball players who were wlecomed OPEN ARMED whiloe they put people in seats, is that 99% of then population could have taken the SAME DRUGS, and would NOT have made it up that mountian "once"....nor would any of them wacked a 95 mph fastball 500 feet.

get over it! dimag56in41: I guess what really bugs me about issues like this http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/dimag56in41/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222156542.html History  | Permalink  | Share it criticschoice 5 Fans 4 hours ago ( 9:36 AM) Lance Armstrong survived cancer. I'm sure he was given steroids to fight cancer. Knowing that steroids help can beat cancer also made him believe it could make him strong enough to do the things he loved, like cycling. He became our hero. I think it snowballed into something he could no longer control. How do you tell people you've been lying. Everyone feels deceived and they were but the 1 who seemed deceived the most is Lance Armstrong . What's left for this guy? I'm sure he'll be sued from left to right. And of course you're still have some money. But we all know money does not make you happy. This is going to be a very unhappy man. And for those were jealous of his money or angry at his lies watching his downfall should give you some Peace..... if that's what you call it criticschoice: Lance Armstrong survived cancer. I'm sure he was given steroids http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/criticschoice/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222294413.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments… hank pihl 14 Fans 19 hours ago ( 7:01 PM) I wonder if Lance sleeps at night.
He has given everyone a snow job for many many years.
How is it possible fro him to come clean,the damage has been done. hank_pihl: I wonder if Lance sleeps at night. He has given http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/hank_pihl/lance-armstrong-confesses-oprah-interview_n_2475422_222152533.html History  | Permalink  | Share it This comment has been down-ranked into oblivion. View comment You have not right to carry out this operation or Error this operation. Loading comments…     Page: 1 2 3 4 5  Next ›  Last »  (142 total) new comment(s) on this entry — Click to refresh Loading comments… FOLLOW US Connect with your friends Check out stories you might like, and see what your friends are sharing! Most Popular on HuffPost Y5xLFnmrcDwz1AKNq8XrkyBN%2BNkKefF7QNPkNWXaBdvW%2FwzuNdpCXlYNXYLGrQFpPn3r3imDsDcEXoGzQkwvfQ0qarpF0ww5 K8PG%2BMMz4fGXgO9gPfvbK60%2BM3Ian%2FbMejU7DG2t%2BiqVQZWKdPWKKKzLj0IiNW%2BPZ1jtQbqhTnBZDhWsc27%2FeEU0pbrUjO5s 1 of 2 Hate Group Drops Aaron Swartz Funeral Protest After Anonymous Vows Action Sandy Hook Hero Cruelly Harassed By Conspiracy Theorists Police Respond To Business School Shooting Belgian Twins Can Die As They Always Lived -- Together PHOTOS: Rachel Zoe Goes Bronzer Crazy 12 Best Colleges For Undergraduates Aaron Swartz's Father: My Son Was 'Killed By The Government' NASCAR's Danica Patrick Files For Divorce NY Passes First Gun Laws In Country Since Newtown

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Video: Lance Armstrong confessed to Oprah Winfrey about his use of performance-enhancing drugs. Oprah discusses the in-depth interview with the "CBS This Morning" co-hosts.

Text Size Print E-mail Reprints By Liz Clarke, The Washington Post

Asked if Lance Armstrong came across as contrite in confessing to having used performance-enhancing drugs during his taped interview on Monday, Oprah Winfrey told “CBS This Morning” that she’d leave that to the viewer to decide when the program airs later this week, adding: “I can only say I was satisfied by the answer. . . .

“He did not come clean in the manner I expected,” Oprah said during a segment promoting the interview, which will be aired over two nights on her Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN). “It was surprising to me. I would say that for myself, my team, all of us in the room, we were mesmerized by some of his answers. . . .

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Lance Armstrong tells Oprah Winfrey about using performance-enhancing drugs: During an interview that will air Thursday, Armstrong, who was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles, said he used the drugs to win the Tour, a person familiar with the situation told the Associated Press.

Video

Travis Tygart, chief executive of the U.S. Anti Doping Agency, says he's not surprised Lance Armstrong may be moving closer to admitting performance enhancing drug use.

“I felt he was thorough. He was serious. He certainly prepared himself for this moment. I would say he met the moment. At the end of it, we both were pretty exhausted.”

The specifics of Armstrong’s admissions remain unclear. The Associated Press reported Monday that he admitted to having used performance-enhancing drugs, citing a source, but offered no additional details.

In the introduction to Tuesday morning’s segment with Winfrey, CBS reported that Armstrong is in talks with U.S. Justice Department officials about returning a portion of the roughly $35 million that the U.S. Postal Service paid his cycling team in sponsorship dollars. Justice Department officials are weighing whether to join a whistleblower lawsuit that has been filed by former cyclist Floyd Landis alleging that Armstrong defrauded the government by doping, a violation of the Postal Service’s contract with the team.

The deadline for the Justice Department to decide whether to join the suit is Thursday, the day that the first installment of Winfrey’s interview is to air on OWN. As part of his talks with the Justice Department, CBS said, Armstrong has expressed a willingness to testify against others regarding doping activity on the pro cycling tour.

Winfrey’s interview marks Armstrong’s first public comments since he was stripped of his record seven Tour de France titles in the wake of a damning report by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency that Armstrong’s professional career was fueled start to finish by banned substances and blood-doping practices.

The interview was conducted at Austin’s Four Season’s Hotel on Monday afternoon.

On “CBS This Morning,” Winfrey explained that she e-mailed Armstrong months ago to express an interest in an interview, then met with him in Maui over the December holidays to discuss it further.

While she said both agreed the contents of the interview would be kept secret until it airs and is simultaneously streamed via the Internet, Winfrey said she was surprised to learn that news of his confession had leaked out by the time her flight from Austin to Chicago had landed. She carried the videotape with her in her purse. And given the extensive nature of the conversation, she and her team have decided to air the interview over two nights rather than one to prevent having to cut so much.

Winfrey said she wasn’t entirely clear why Armstrong chose to confess now, after having denied doping so vehemently for so many years.

“I think he was just ready,” Winfrey said. “The velocity of everything that has come at him in the past several months — particularly the past several weeks — he was ready.”

More on Lance Armstrong:

Is his long-awaited confession enough?

Oprah: Armstrong ‘did not come clean in the manner I expected’

Disgraced cyclist comes clean to Oprah

Armstrong might return millions

An emotional interview for Armstrong

Cyclist makes apologies to colleagues

Armstrong apoligizes to Livestrong staff

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Lance Armstrong Wednesday, January 16, 2013 NYDailyNews.com / Topics Jobs Autos Classifieds Contests Daily Reader Offers Home Delivery Search Field site web blogs Powered by Yahoo Daily News America New York News Politics Sports Showbiz Opinion Living Photos Video Services Lance Armstrong Hey Oprah, here's what to ask Lance

When Lance Armstrong sits down with Oprah Winfrey on Monday at his Austin, Tex., home for an interview scheduled to be broadcast Thursday, he is expected to make a limited admission to doping in his i...

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Livestrong: We expect Lance to be completely truthful

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1 2 3 4 5

Hey Oprah, here's what to ask Lance

Posted on 2013-01-16 12:51:07

When Lance Armstrong sits down with Oprah Winfrey on Monday at his Austin, Tex., home for an interview scheduled to be broadcast Thursday, he is expected to make a limited admission to doping in his illustrious cycling career. Read More

Lance not quite contrite about doping in Oprah interview: source

Posted on 2013-01-16 11:37:29

Lance Armstrong was not contrite when he finally acknowledged that he used performance-enhancing drugs over his long cycling career during his upcoming sit-down interview on Monday with Oprah Winfrey, a source familiar with the 2½-hour session at an Austin hotel told the Daily News. Read More

Lance's legal fate rests in AG Holder's hands

Posted on 2013-01-16 11:36:47

The Daily News has learned that Department of Justice officials who were leaning heavily toward joining the whistleblower lawsuit filed in 2010 by former Armstrong teammate Floyd Landis have now pulled back from their decision, leaving it to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to make the call. Read More

Nike CEO hints at possible reunion with Lance

Posted on 2013-01-16 10:12:04

Despite the sneaker and apparel giant's announcement last year that it was severing ties with the cyclist in the wake of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's damning report laying out Armstrong's long doping history, Nike CEO Phil Knight hinted at a possible reunion between the company and disgraced cyclist in a TMZ report. Read More

Livestrong: We expect Lance to be completely truthful

Posted on 2013-01-16 09:56:17

As Lance Armstrong began the process of trying to make amends to those close to him, and even to some of his adversaries, his cancer foundation, Livestrong, issued a statement Wednesday morning in response to requests for information about the interview Armstrong conducted Monday with Oprah Winfrey. Read More

Lupica: Lying Lance can't win this final stage

Posted on 2013-01-16 02:40:19

Lance Armstrong has told so many lies across the years, so many of them about his own doping, even he must lose track of them sometimes. Some have been told to the media, some in depositions, some to those who dared to cross him. Read More

Oprah 'satisfied' with what Lance confessed

Posted on 2013-01-15 11:50:17

Oprah Winfrey said she walked away from her interview with disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong "satisfied" with what Armstrong confessed, with regard to his admission that he used performance-enhancing drugs en route to his record seven Tour de France victories. Read More

Lance admits to Oprah he used PEDs

Posted on 2013-01-15 09:23:02

Surrounded by about 10 close friends and advisers, Lance Armstrong admitted to using performance enhancing during his widely anticipated sit-down with Oprah Winfrey Monday afternoon. Read More

Admitted doper Lance may rat out other cheaters

Posted on 2013-01-15 03:21:27

The Lance Armstrong Ride to Redemption began in earnest on Monday, and not just because the disgraced cyclist admitted as expected to the doping that cost him his seven Tour de France victories during an emotional interview with Oprah Winfrey. Read More

Lance says he's ready to speak candidly to Oprah

Posted on 2013-01-13 22:27:46

Lance Armstrong is “ready to speak candidly” as he prepares to discuss doping allegations against him in his upcoming interview with Oprah Winfrey. Armstrong was out for a morning run Sunday when he spoke briefly with The Associated Press. Read More

Lupica: Armstrong's worldwide web of lies

Posted on 2013-01-13 02:53:54

To the end Lance Armstrong, desperate to remain relevant, somehow is allowed to control his own narrative. So after all the lies, there comes one last one: That he still has something we want. To the end this guy thinks he can play the whole world for suckers. That he still has something we want. Read More

Report: Lance plans to admit to doping during Oprah interview

Posted on 2013-01-12 00:17:21

Oprah Winfrey has a knack for inducing weepy confessions on her couch, but on Monday, the TV personality is expected to get a bombshell admission from Lance Armstrong while interviewing the steroid-stained cyclist at his home in Austin, Texas. Read More

Cleaning up cycling doesn't end with Lance: Kimmage

Posted on 2013-01-09 12:26:54

Lance Armstrong’s cycling legacy has been tarnished, but Paul Kimmage, the Irish journalist who spent so many years trying to expose Armstrong as a steroid cheat, says he’s not ready for a victory lap just yet. Read More

Oprah nabs interview with Lance Armstrong

Posted on 2013-01-09 00:30:43

Steroid-stained cyclist Lance Armstrong will discuss the doping scandal that cost him his seven Tour de France titles with Oprah Winfrey on Jan. 17 during a 90-minute episode of “Oprah’s Next Chapter.” Read More

Lance offered six-figure 'donation' to USADA

Posted on 2013-01-08 18:05:42

One of Lance Armstrong's representatives offered a $250,000 "donation" to the United States Anti-Doping Agency in 2004, "60 Minutes Sports" will report in an explosive segment that is scheduled to air on Wednesday, an offer the organization believed was inappropriate and quickly rejected. Read More

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Lance Armstrong - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Lance Armstrong From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search For the Tasmanian politician, see Lance Armstrong (politician). Lance Armstrong
Armstrong at the 2010 Tour de France Personal information Full name Lance Edward Armstrong Nickname The Boss, Juan Pelota, Big Tex, The Texan,[1]
Mellow Johnny (from maillot jaune which is French for yellow jersey)[2] Born (1971-09-18) September 18, 1971 (age 41)
Plano, Texas, United States Height 1.77 m (5 ft 9 1⁄2 in)[3] Weight 75 kg (165 lb)[3] Team information Discipline Road Role Rider Rider type All-Rounder Amateur team(s) 1990–1991
1991 Subaru-Montgomery
US National Team Professional team(s) 1992–1996
1997
1998–2004
2005
2009
2010–2011 Motorola
Cofidis
US Postal
Discovery Channel
Astana
Team RadioShack Major wins

Single-Day Races and Classics

World Cycling Champion (1993) US National Cycling Champion (1993) Clásica de San Sebastián (1995) La Flèche Wallonne (1996) Medal record Competitor for  United States Men's Cycling World Championships Gold 1993 Oslo Elite Men's Road Race Olympic Games Bronze 2000 Sydney Men's time trial Infobox last updated on
October 22, 2012

Lance Edward Armstrong (born Lance Edward Gunderson, September 18, 1971) is an American former professional road racing cyclist. Armstrong had won the Tour de France a record seven consecutive times between 1999 and 2005, but in 2012 he was disqualified from all his results since August 1998 for using and distributing performance-enhancing drugs and was banned from professional cycling for life.[4] Armstrong did not appeal the decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.[5] He repeatedly denied ever doping.[6][7]

At 16, Armstrong began competing as a triathlete and became a national sprint-course triathlon champion in 1989 and 1990. In 1992, Armstrong began his career as a professional cyclist with the Motorola team. He had notable success between 1993 and 1996, including the 1993 World Championship, Clásica de San Sebastián in 1995, an overall victory in the penultimate Tour DuPont and a handful of stage victories in Europe, including the stage to Limoges in the Tour de France.

In October 1996, he was diagnosed with testicular cancer that had spread to his brain and lungs. His cancer treatments included brain and testicular surgery and extensive chemotherapy. In February 1997, he was declared cancer-free and the same year he founded the Lance Armstrong Foundation for cancer support. By January 1998, Armstrong had renewed serious cycling training, having signed a new racing contract with US Postal. He was a member of the US Postal/Discovery team between 1998 and 2005. On July 24, 2005, Armstrong retired from racing at the end of the 2005 Tour de France, but returned to competitive cycling with the Astana team in January 2009 and finished third in the 2009 Tour de France. Between 2010 and 2011, he raced with the UCI ProTeam he helped found, Team Radio Shack.

On February 16, 2011, he announced his retirement from competitive cycling, while facing a US federal investigation into doping allegations. In February 2012, he returned to triathlon, competing as a professional in several events. In June 2012, the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) charged Armstrong with having used illicit performance-enhancing drugs,[8] and in August it announced a lifetime ban from competition, which applies in all sports which follow the World Anti Doping Agency code, as well as the stripping of all titles won since August 1998. The USADA report stated that Armstrong enforced "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen".[9] On October 22, 2012, the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), the sport's governing body, announced its decision to accept USADA's findings regarding Armstrong.[10]

Contents 1 Career 1.1 Early career 1.2 Motorola: 1992–96 1.3 Cancer 1.4 US Postal/Discovery: 1998–2005 1.5 Comeback 1.5.1 Astana: 2009 1.5.2 Team RadioShack: 2010–11 1.6 Physical attributes 1.7 Collaboration of sponsors 2 Family and personal life 3 History of allegations of doping 3.1 Working with Michele Ferrari 3.2 L.A. Confidentiel - 2004 3.3 Tour de France urine tests - 2005 3.4 SCA Promotions case: 2005 3.5 Federal Enquiry 2010-2012 4 USADA Investigation 2011–2012 4.1 Activity leading to August decision 4.2 UCI response and reasoned decision 4.3 Other reactions 4.4 Armstrong chooses not to appeal to CAS 4.5 Possible admission 5 Outside of cycling 5.1 Marathons 5.2 Triathlon 6 Politics 7 Palmares 7.1 Grand Tours overall classification results timeline 8 Filmography 9 Accolades 10 See also 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External links Career Early career

Armstrong was born on September 18, 1971, at Methodist Hospital in Plano, Texas, north of Dallas.[11] At the age of 12 he started racing in his sporting career as a swimmer at the City of Plano Swim Club and finished fourth in Texas state 1,500-meter freestyle. He stopped swimming-only races after seeing a poster for a junior triathlon, called the Iron Kids Triathlon, which he won at age 13.[12]

In the 1987–1988 Tri-Fed/Texas ("Tri-Fed" was the former name of USA Triathlon), Armstrong was ranked the number-one triathlete in the 19-and-under group; second place was Chann McRae, who became a US Postal Service cycling teammate and the 2002 USPRO national champion. Armstrong's total points in 1987 as an amateur were better than those of five professionals ranked higher than he was that year. At 16, Lance Armstrong became a professional triathlete and became national sprint-course triathlon champion in 1989 and 1990 at 18 and 19, respectively.[13]

Motorola: 1992–96

In 1992 Armstrong turned professional with the Motorola Cycling Team, the successor of 7-Eleven team. In 1993, Armstrong won 10 one-day events and stage races, but his breakthrough victory was the UCI Road World Championship held in Norway. Prior to his World's win, he took his first win at the Tour de France, in the stage from Châlons-sur-Marne to Verdun. He was 97th in the general classification when he retired after stage 12.

He also collected the Thrift Drug Triple Crown of Cycling: the Thrift Drug Classic in Pittsburgh, the K-Mart West Virginia Classic, and the CoreStates USPRO national championship in Philadelphia.

In 1994, he again won the Thrift Drug Classic and came second in the Tour DuPont in the United States. His successes in Europe occurred when he placed second in Liège–Bastogne–Liège and the Clásica de San Sebastián, where just two years before, he had finished in last place as his first all-pro event in Europe.

He won the Clásica de San Sebastián in 1995, followed by an overall victory in the penultimate Tour DuPont and a handful of stage victories in Europe, including the stage to Limoges in the Tour de France, three days after the death of his teammate Fabio Casartelli, who crashed on the descent of the Col de Portet d'Aspet on the 15th stage.

Armstrong's successes were much the same in 1996. He became the first American to win the La Flèche Wallonne and again won the Tour DuPont. However, he was able to compete for only five days in the Tour de France. In the 1996 Olympic Games, he finished 6th in the time trial and 12th in the road race. In August 1996 following the Leeds Classic, Armstrong signed a 2-year, $2m deal with the French Cofidis Cycling Team. Joining him in signing contracts with the French team were teammates Frankie Andreu and Laurent Madouas. Two months later, in October 1996, he was diagnosed with testicular cancer.

Cancer

On October 2, 1996, then aged 25, Armstrong was diagnosed as having stage three (advanced) testicular cancer (embryonal carcinoma).[14] The cancer spread to his lungs, abdomen and brain. On his first visit to a urologist in Austin, Texas, for his cancer symptoms, he was coughing up blood and had a large, painful testicular tumor. Immediate surgery and chemotherapy saved his life. Armstrong had an orchiectomy to remove his diseased testicle. After his surgery, his doctor said that he had less than a 40% survival chance.[15]

The standard chemotherapeutic regimen for the treatment of this type of cancer is a cocktail of the drugs bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (or Platinol) (BEP). Armstrong, however, chose an alternative, etoposide, ifosfamide, and cisplatin (VIP), to avoid the lung toxicity associated with bleomycin.[15] This decision may have saved his cycling career. His primary treatment was received at the Indiana University (IU), Indianapolis, Medical Center, where Lawrence Einhorn had pioneered the use of cisplatinum to treat testicular cancer. His primary oncologist there was Craig Nichols.[15] His brain tumors were surgically removed by Scott A. Shapiro, MD, Professor of Neurosurgery at Indiana University and Resident Director, and were found to contain extensive necrosis.[16]

According to Armstrong's first book, Shapiro convinced him that he was the right neurosurgeon for him by saying: "You'll have to convince me you know what you're doing," said Armstrong. "Look, I've done a large number of these," Shapiro said, "I've never had anyone die, and I've never made anyone worse." "Yeah, but why should you be the person who operates on my head?" Armstrong responded. "Because as good as you are at cycling" – he paused – "I'm a lot better at brain surgery".[15]

Armstrong's last chemotherapy treatment was received on December 13, 1996. In February of 1997, he was declared cancer-free, but shortly afterward came the news that his contract with the Cofidis team had been cancelled. Again it was a former boss at Subaru Montgomery who came to the rescue, offering him a contract with the US Postal team on a salary of $200,000 a year. By January 1998, Armstrong was already engaged in serious training for racing, moving to Europe with the team. A pivotal week (April 1998) in his comeback was one he spent training in the very challenging Appalachian terrain around Boone, North Carolina, with his racing friend Bob Roll.[15]

US Postal/Discovery: 1998–2005

Before his cancer treatment, Armstrong had won two Tour de France stages. In 1993, he won the eighth stage and in 1995; he took stage 18 in honor of teammate Fabio Casartelli who crashed and died on stage 15. Armstrong dropped out of the 1996 Tour after the fifth stage after becoming ill, a few months before his diagnosis.

Armstrong finishing third in Sète, taking over the Yellow Jersey at Grand Prix Midi Libre.

Armstrong's cycling comeback began in 1998 when he finished fourth in the Vuelta a España. In 1999 he won the Tour de France, including four stages. He beat the second rider, Alex Zülle, by 7 minutes 37 seconds. However, the absence of Jan Ullrich (injury) and Marco Pantani (drug allegations) meant Armstrong had not yet proven himself against the biggest names. Stage wins included the prologue, stage eight, an individual time trial in Metz, an Alpine stage on stage nine, and the second individual time trial on stage 19.

In 2000, Ullrich and Pantani returned to challenge Armstrong. The race that began a six-year rivalry between Ullrich and Armstrong ended in victory for Armstrong by 6 minutes 2 seconds over Ullrich. Armstrong took one stage in the 2000 Tour, the second individual time trial on stage 19. In 2001, Armstrong again took top honors, beating Ullrich by 6 minutes 44 seconds. In 2002, Ullrich did not participate due to suspension, and Armstrong won by seven minutes over Joseba Beloki.

Armstrong riding the prologue of the 2004 Tour de France.

The pattern returned in 2003, Armstrong taking first place and Ullrich second. Only a minute and a second separated the two at the end of the final day in Paris. U.S. Postal won the team time trial on stage four, while Armstrong took stage 15, despite having been knocked off on the ascent to Luz Ardiden, the final climb, when a spectator's bag caught his right handlebar. Ullrich waited for him, which brought Ullrich fair-play honors.[17]

In 2004, Armstrong finished first, 6 minutes 19 seconds ahead of German Andreas Klöden. Ullrich was fourth, a further 2 minutes 31 seconds behind. Armstrong won a personal-best five individual stages, plus the team time trial. He became the first biker since Gino Bartali in 1948 to win three consecutive mountain stages; 15, 16, and 17.

The individual time trial on stage 16 up Alpe d'Huez was won in style by Armstrong as he passed Ivan Basso on the way despite having set out two minutes after the Italian. He won sprint finishes from Basso in stages 13 and 15 and made up a significant gap in the last 250 m to nip Klöden at the line in stage 17. He won the final individual time trial, stage 19, to complete his personal record of stage wins.

Armstrong wearing the yellow jersey at the 2005 Tour de France.

In 2005, Armstrong was beaten by David Zabriskie in the Stage 1 time trial by two seconds, despite having passed Ullrich on the road. His Discovery Channel team won the team time trial, while Armstrong won the final individual time trial. In the mountain stages, Armstrong's lead was attacked multiple times mostly by Ivan Basso, but also by T-mobile leaders Jan Ullrich, Andreas Kloden and Alexandre Vinokourov and former teammate Levi Leipheimer. But still, the American champion handled them well, maintained his lead and, on some occasions, increased it. To complete his record-breaking feat, Armstrong crossed the line on the Champs-Élysées on July 24 to win his seventh consecutive Tour, finishing 4m 40s ahead of Basso, with Ullrich third. Another record achieved that year was that Armstrong completed the tour at the highest pace in the race's history: his average speed over the whole tour was 41.7 km/h (26 mph).[18]

On July 24, 2005, Armstrong announced his retirement from professional cycling.[19]

Comeback Astana: 2009 See also: 2009 Astana season

Armstrong announced on September 9, 2008, that he would return to pro cycling with the express goal of participating in the 2009 Tour de France.[20][21] VeloNews reported that Armstrong would race for no salary or bonuses and would post his internally tested blood results online.[21]

Armstrong riding for Astana on Stage 17 of the 2009 Tour de France.

Australian ABC radio reported on September 24, 2008, that Armstrong would compete in the UCI Tour Down Under through Adelaide and surrounding areas in January 2009. UCI rules say a cyclist has to be in an anti-doping program for six months before an event, but UCI allowed Armstrong to compete.[22] He had to retire from the 2009 Vuelta a Castilla y León during the first stage after crashing in a rider pileup in Baltanás, Spain, and breaking his collarbone.[23] Armstrong flew back to Austin, Texas, for corrective surgery, which was successful, and was back training on a bicycle within four days of his operation.[24]

On April 10, 2009, a controversy emerged between the French anti-doping agency AFLD and Armstrong and his team manager, Johan Bruyneel, stemming from a March 17, 2009, encounter with an AFLD anti-doping official who visited Armstrong after a training ride in Beaulieu-sur-Mer. When the official arrived, Armstrong claims he asked—and was granted—permission to take a shower while Bruyneel checked the official's credentials. In late April, the AFLD cleared Armstrong of any wrongdoing.[25] Armstrong returned to racing after his collarbone injury at the Tour of the Gila in New Mexico on April 29.[26]

On July 7, in the fourth stage of the 2009 Tour de France, Armstrong narrowly failed to win the yellow jersey after his Astana team won the team time trial. His Astana team won the 39 km lap of Montpellier but Armstrong ended up just over two tenths of a second (0.22) outside of Fabian Cancellara's overall lead.[27] Armstrong finished the 2009 Tour de France in third place overall, 5:24 behind the overall winner, his Astana teammate Alberto Contador.

Team RadioShack: 2010–11

On July 21, 2009, Armstrong announced that he would return to the Tour de France in 2010.[28] RadioShack was named as the main sponsor for Armstrong's 2010 team, named Team RadioShack.[29][30] Armstrong made his 2010 season debut at the Tour Down Under where he finished 25th out of the 127 riders who completed the race. He made his European season debut at the 2010 Vuelta a Murcia finishing in seventh place overall. Armstrong was also set to compete in several classics such as the Milan – San Remo, Amstel Gold Race, Liège–Bastogne–Liège, and the Tour of Flanders, but bouts with gastroenteritis forced his withdrawal from three of the four races.[31]

Armstrong returned to the United States in mid-April to compete in the Tour of Gila and May's Tour of California, both as preparation for the Tour de France. However, he crashed outside Visalia early in stage 5 of the Tour of California and had to withdraw from the race.[32] He showed fine shape after recovering from the Tour of California crash, placing second in the Tour of Switzerland and third in the Tour of Luxembourg.

On June 28, Armstrong announced via Twitter that the 2010 edition would be his final Tour de France.[33] Armstrong put in an impressive performance in the Tour de France prologue TT, finishing third, but was plagued by crashes in later stages that put him out of GC contention, especially a serious crash in stage 8. He rallied for the brutal Pyreneean stage 16, working as a key player in a successful break that included teammate Chris Horner. He finished his last tour in 23rd place, 39 minutes 20 seconds behind former winner Alberto Contador.[34] He was also a key rider in helping Team RadioShack win the team competition, beating Caisse d'Epargne by 9 minutes, 15 seconds.

In October, he announced the end of his international career after the Tour Down Under in January 2011. He stated that after January 2011, he will race only in the U.S. with the Radioshack domestic team.[35]

Armstrong announced his retirement from competitive cycling 'for good' on February 16, 2011, while still facing a US federal investigation into doping allegations.[36][37]

Physical attributes

Armstrong has recorded an aerobic capacity of 83.8 mL/kg/min (VO2 max),[38][39] much higher than the average person (40–50), but lower than some other Tour De France winners, such as Miguel Indurain (88.0, although reports exist that Indurain tested at 92–94) and Greg LeMond (92.5).[40] At his peak, he had a resting heart rate of 32–34 beats per minute (bpm) with a maximum heart rate of 201 bpm.[41]

Collaboration of sponsors

Armstrong revolutionized the support behind his well-funded teams, asking sponsors and suppliers to contribute and act as part of the team.[42] For example, rather than having the frame, handlebars, and tires designed and developed by separate companies with little interaction, his teams adopted a Formula One relationship with sponsors and suppliers named "F-One",[43] taking full advantage of the combined resources of several organizations working in close communication. The team, Trek, Nike, AMD, Bontrager (a Trek company), Shimano, Sram, Giro and Oakley, collaborated for an array of products.

Family and personal life

Armstrong was born to Linda Gayle (née Mooneyham), a secretary, and Eddie Charles Gunderson, a route manager for The Dallas Morning News. His great-grandfather was the son of Norwegian immigrants.[44] He was named after Lance Rentzel, a Dallas Cowboys wide receiver. His parents divorced when Lance was two and his father has two children from another relationship. His mother later married Terry Keith Armstrong, a wholesale salesman, who adopted Lance in 1974. Armstrong refused to meet his birth father.[45]

Armstrong (center) on the set of College GameDay during the 2006 UT football season.

Armstrong met Kristin Richard in June 1997. They married on May 1, 1998 and had three children: Luke David, born October 1999, and twins Isabelle Rose and Grace Elisabeth, born November 2001. The pregnancy was possible through sperm Armstrong banked three years earlier, prior to chemotherapy and surgery.[46] The couple filed for divorce in September 2003. At Armstrong's request, his children flew in for the Tour de France podium ceremony in 2005, where Luke helped his father hoist the trophy, while his daughters (in yellow dresses) held the stuffed lion mascot and bouquet of yellow flowers.

Armstrong began dating singer-songwriter Sheryl Crow in late 2003 and revealed their relationship in January 2004. The couple announced their engagement in September 2005 and their split in February 2006.

In December 2008, Armstrong announced that his girlfriend, Anna Hansen, was pregnant with his child. The couple started dating in July 2008 after meeting through Armstrong's charity work. Although it was believed that Armstrong could no longer father children, after having undergone chemotherapy for testicular cancer, this child was conceived naturally.[47] The baby boy, Maxwell Edward Armstrong, was born in 2009 in Aspen, Colorado. Armstrong announced the birth via Twitter.[48] Armstrong has become a popular Twitter user, with 3,385,486 followers on April 10, 2012. [49] In April 2010, Armstrong, using Twitter, announced that Anna Hansen was having his fifth child. Olivia Marie Armstrong was born in October 2010.[50]

Armstrong owns homes in Austin, Texas, and Aspen, Colorado, as well as a ranch in the Texas Hill Country.[51]

History of allegations of doping Main article: Lance Armstrong doping allegations

For much of his career, Armstrong faced persistent allegations of doping.[52] Armstrong has denied all such allegations, often claiming that he never had any positive test in the approximately 600 drug tests he's taken over his cycling career.[53]

Armstrong has been criticised for his disagreements with outspoken opponents of doping such as Paul Kimmage[54][55] and Christophe Bassons.[56][57] Bassons was a rider for Festina at the time of the Festina Affair and was widely reported by teammates as being the only rider on the team not to be taking performance enhancing drugs. Bassons wrote a number of articles for a French newspaper during the 1999 Tour de France which made references to doping in the peloton. Subsequently, Armstrong had an altercation with Bassons during the 1999 Tour de France where Bassons said Armstrong rode up alongside on the Alpe d'Huez stage to tell him "it was a mistake to speak out the way I (Bassons) do and he (Armstrong) asked why I was doing it. I told him that I'm thinking of the next generation of riders. Then he said 'Why don't you leave, then?'"[58]

Armstrong confirmed the story. On the main evening news on TF1, a national television station, Armstrong said: "His accusations aren't good for cycling, for his team, for me, for anybody. If he thinks cycling works like that, he's wrong and he would be better off going home".[59] Kimmage, a professional cyclist in the 1980s who later became a sports journalist, referred to Armstrong as a "cancer in cycling".[57] He also asked Armstrong questions in relation to his "admiration for dopers" at a press conference at the Tour of California in 2009, provoking a scathing reaction from Armstrong.[57] This spat continued and is exemplified by Kimmage's articles in The Irish Independent.[60]

Armstrong has continually denied using illegal performance-enhancing drugs and has described himself as the most tested athlete in the world.[61] From his return to cycling in the fall of 2008 through March 2009, Armstrong claims to have submitted to 24 unannounced drug tests by various anti-doping authorities.[62][63]

Working with Michele Ferrari

Armstrong was criticized for working with controversial trainer Michele Ferrari. Ferrari claimed that he was introduced to Lance by Eddy Merckx in 1995.[64] Greg LeMond described himself as "devastated" on hearing of them working together, while Tour de France organizer Jean-Marie Leblanc said, "I am not happy the two names are mixed."[65] Following Ferrari's later-overturned conviction for "sporting fraud" and "abuse of the medical profession", Armstrong claimed he suspended his professional relationship with him, saying that he had "zero tolerance for anyone convicted of using or facilitating the use of performance-enhancing drugs" and denying that Ferrari had ever "suggested, prescribed or provided me with any performance-enhancing drugs."[66]

Though Ferrari was banned from practicing medicine with cyclists by the Italian Cycling Federation, according to Italian law enforcement authorities, Armstrong met with Ferrari as recently as 2010 in a country outside of Italy.[67] According to Cycling News, "USADA reveals an intimate role played by Dr. Michele Ferrari in masterminding Armstrong's Tour de France success". According to the USADA report, Armstrong paid Ferrari over a million dollars in payments from 1996 to 2006, countering Armstrong's claim that he severed his professional relationship with Ferrari in 2004. The report also includes numerous eyewitness accounts of Ferrari injecting Armstrong with EPO on a number of occasions.[68]

L.A. Confidentiel - 2004 Main article: L.A. Confidentiel

In 2004, reporters Pierre Ballester and David Walsh published a book alleging Armstrong had used performance-enhancing drugs (L.A. Confidentiel – Les secrets de Lance Armstrong). Another figure in the book, Steve Swart, claims he and other riders, including Armstrong, began using drugs in 1995 while members of the Motorola team, a claim denied by other team members.[69][70]

Among the allegations in the book were claims by Armstrong's former masseuse Emma O'Reilly that a backdated prescription for cortisone had been produced in 1999 to avoid a positive test. A 1999 urine sample at the Tour de France showed traces of corticosteroid. A medical certificate showed he used an approved cream for saddle sores which contained the substance.[71] O'Reilly said she heard team officials worrying about Armstrong's positive test for steroids during the Tour. She said: "They were in a panic, saying: 'What are we going to do? What are we going to do?'".[72]

According to O'Reilly, the solution was to get one of their compliant doctors to issue a pre-dated prescription for a steroid-based ointment to combat saddle sores. O'Reilly said she would have known if Armstrong had saddle sores as she would have administered any treatment for it. O'Reilly said that Armstrong told her: "Now, Emma, you know enough to bring me down." O'Reilly said on other occasions she was asked to dispose of used syringes for Armstrong and pick up strange parcels for the team.[73]

Allegations in the book were reprinted in the UK newspaper The Sunday Times in a story by deputy sports editor Alan English in June 2004. Armstrong sued for libel, and the paper settled out of court after a High Court judge in a pre-trial ruling stated that the article "meant accusation of guilt and not simply reasonable grounds to suspect."[74] The newspaper's lawyers issued the statement: "The Sunday Times has confirmed to Mr. Armstrong that it never intended to accuse him of being guilty of taking any performance-enhancing drugs and sincerely apologized for any such impression." The same authors (Pierre Ballester and David Walsh) subsequently published "L.A. Official" and "Le Sale Tour" (The Dirty Trick), further pressing their claims that Armstrong used performance-enhancing drugs throughout his career.

On March 31, 2005, Mike Anderson filed a brief[75] in Travis County District Court in Texas, as part of a legal battle following his termination in November 2004 as an employee of Armstrong. Anderson worked for Armstrong for two years as a personal assistant. In the brief, Anderson claimed that he discovered a box of androstenone while cleaning a bathroom in Armstrong's apartment in Girona, Spain.[76] Androstenone is not on the list of banned drugs. Anderson stated in a subsequent deposition that he had no direct knowledge of Armstrong using a banned substance. Armstrong denied the claim and issued a counter-suit.[77] The two men reached an out-of-court settlement in November 2005; the terms of the agreement were not disclosed.[78]

In November 2012, Times Newspapers republished all of David Walsh's articles as well as the original LA Confidential article by Alan English in a book "Lanced: The shaming of Lance Armstrong" [79] The Times are said to be considering taking action to recoup monies from Armstrong in relation to the settlement and court costs.[80]

In December 2012 the London Sunday Times filed suit against Armstrong for $1.5 million. In its suit, the paper is seeking a return of the original settlement, plus interest and the cost of defending the original case. [Ref] Associated Press, "Sunday Times suing Armstrong", Japan Times, 25 December 2012, p. 15.

Tour de France urine tests - 2005

On August 23, 2005, L'Équipe, a major French daily sports newspaper, reported on its front page under the headline "le mensonge Armstrong" ("The Armstrong Lie") that 6 urine samples taken from the cyclist during the prologue and five stages of the 1999 Tour de France, frozen and stored since at "Laboratoire national de dépistage du dopage de Châtenay-Malabry" (LNDD), had tested positive for erythropoietin (EPO) in recent retesting conducted as part of a research project into EPO testing methods.[81][82]

Armstrong immediately replied on his website, saying, "Unfortunately, the witch hunt continues and tomorrow's article is nothing short of tabloid journalism. The paper even admits in its own article that the science in question here is faulty and that I have no way to defend myself. They state: 'There will therefore be no counter-exam nor regulatory prosecutions, in a strict sense, since defendant's rights cannot be respected.' I will simply restate what I have said many times: I have never taken performance enhancing drugs."[83]

In October 2005, in response to calls from the International Olympic Committee and the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) for an independent investigation, the UCI appointed Dutch lawyer Emile Vrijman to investigate the handling of urine tests by the French national anti-doping laboratory, LNDD. Vrijman was head of the Dutch anti-doping agency for ten years; since then he has worked as a defense attorney defending high-profile athletes against doping charges.[84] Vrijman's report cleared Armstrong because of improper handling and testing.[85][86] The report said tests on urine samples were conducted improperly and fell so short of scientific standards that it was "completely irresponsible" to suggest they "constitute evidence of anything."[87]

The recommendation of the commission's report was no disciplinary action against any rider on the basis of LNDD research. It also called upon the WADA and LNDD to submit themselves to an investigation by an outside independent authority.[88] The IOC Ethics Commission subsequently censured Dick Pound, the President of WADA and a member of the IOC, for his statements in the media that suggested wrongdoing by Armstrong.

In April 2009, Michael Ashenden said that "the LNDD absolutely had no way of knowing athlete identity from the sample they're given. They have a number on them, but that's never linked to an athlete's name. The only group that had both the number and the athlete's name is the federation, in this case it was the UCI." He added "There was only two conceivable ways that synthetic EPO could've gotten into those samples. One, is that Lance Armstrong used EPO during the '99 Tour. The other way it could've got in the urine was if, as Lance Armstrong seems to believe, the laboratory spiked those samples. Now, that's an extraordinary claim, and there's never ever been any evidence the laboratory has ever spiked an athlete's sample, even during the Cold War, where you would've thought there was a real political motive to frame an athlete from a different country. There's never been any suggestion that it happened."[89]

Ashenden's statements are at odds with the findings of the Vrijman report. "According to Mr. Ressiot, the manner in which the LNDD had structured the results table of its report – i.e. listing the sequence of each of the batches, as well as the exact number of urine samples per batch, in the same (chronological) order as the stages of the 1999 Tour de France they were collected at – was already sufficient to allow him to determine the exact stage these urine samples referred to and subsequently the identity of the riders who were tested at that stage." The Vrijman report also says "Le Monde of July 21 and 23, 1999 reveal that the press knew the contents of original doping forms of the 1999 Tour de France".[88]

SCA Promotions case: 2005

In June 2006, French newspaper Le Monde reported claims by Betsy and Frankie Andreu during a deposition that Armstrong had admitted using performance-enhancing drugs to his physician just after brain surgery in 1996. The Andreus' testimony was related to litigation between Armstrong and SCA Promotions, a Texas company attempting to withhold a $5-million bonus; this was settled out of court with SCA paying Armstrong and Tailwind Sports $7.5 million, to cover the $5-million bonus plus interest and lawyers' fees. The testimony stated "And so the doctor asked him a few questions, not many, and then one of the questions he asked was... have you ever used any performance-enhancing drugs? And Lance said yes. And the doctor asked, what were they? And Lance said, growth hormone, cortisone, EPO, steroids and testosterone."[90]

Armstrong suggested Betsy Andreu may have been confused by possible mention of his post-operative treatment which included steroids and EPO that are taken to counteract wasting and red-blood-cell-destroying effects of intensive chemotherapy.[91] The Andreus' allegation was not supported by any of the eight other people present, including Armstrong's doctor Craig Nichols,[92] or his medical history. According to Greg LeMond (who has been embroiled with his own disputes with Armstrong), he (LeMond) had a recorded conversation,[93] the transcript of which was reviewed by National Public Radio (NPR), with Stephanie McIlvain (Armstrong's contact at Oakley Inc.) in which she said of Armstrong's alleged admission 'You know, I was in that room. I heard it.' However, McIlvain has contradicted LeMond allegations on the issue and denied under oath that the incident in question ever occurred in her sworn testimony.[90]

In July 2006, the Los Angeles Times published a story on the allegations raised in the SCA case.[94] The report cited evidence at the trial including the results of the LNDD test and an analysis of these results by an expert witness.[95] From the Los Angeles Times article: "The results, Australian researcher Michael Ashenden testified in Dallas, show Armstrong's levels rising and falling, consistent with a series of injections during the Tour. Ashenden, a paid expert retained by SCA Promotions, told arbitrators the results painted a "compelling picture" that the world's most famous cyclist "used EPO in the '99 Tour."[94]

Ashenden's finding were disputed by the Vrijman report, which pointed to procedural and privacy issues in dismissing the LNDD test results. The Los Angeles Times article also provided information on testimony given by Armstrong's former teammate, Swart, Andreu and his wife Betsy, and instant messaging conversation between Andreu and Jonathan Vaughters regarding blood-doping in the peloton. Vaughters signed a statement disavowing the comments and stating he had: "no personal knowledge that any team in the Tour de France, including Armstrong's Discovery team in 2005, engaged in any prohibited conduct whatsoever." Andreu signed a statement affirming the conversation took place as indicated on the instant messaging logs submitted to the court.[96]

The SCA trial was settled out of court, and the Los Angeles Times reported: "Though no verdict or finding of facts was rendered, Armstrong called the outcome proof that the doping allegations were baseless." The Los Angeles Times article provides a review of the disputed positive EPO test, allegations and sworn testimony against Armstrong, but notes that: "They are filled with conflicting testimony, hearsay and circumstantial evidence admissible in arbitration hearings but questionable in more formal legal proceedings."[96]

In October, 2012, following the publication of the USADA reasoned decision, SCA Promotions announced its intention to recoup the monies paid to Armstrong totaling in excess of $7 million. Armstrong's legal representative Tim Herman stated in June ""When SCA decided to settle the case, it settled the entire matter forever. No backs. No re-dos. No do-overs. SCA knowingly and independently waived any right to make further claims to any of the money it paid." [97] SCA’s Jeff Dorough stated that on October 30, 2012, Armstrong was sent formal requesting the return of $12m in bonuses. It is alleged that Armstrong's legal team have offered settlement of $1 million[98][99]

Federal Enquiry 2010-2012

U.S. federal prosecutors pursued allegations of doping by Armstrong from 2010–2012. The effort convened a grand jury to investigate doping charges, including taking statements under oath from Armstrong's former team members and other associates; met with officials from France, Belgium, Spain, and Italy; and requested samples from the French anti-doping agency. The investigation was led by federal agent Jeff Novitzky, who also investigated suspicions of steroid use by baseball players Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens.

On May 20, 2010, former U.S. Postal teammate Floyd Landis accused Armstrong of doping in 2002 and 2003, and claimed that U.S. Postal team director Johan Bruyneel had bribed former UCI president Hein Verbruggen to keep quiet about a positive Armstrong test in 2002.[100][101] Landis admitted there was no documentation that supports these claims.[102] However, in July 2010 the president of the UCI, Pat McQuaid, revealed that Armstrong made two donations to the UCI: $25,000 in 2002, used by the juniors anti-doping program, and $100,000 in 2005, to buy a blood testing machine, and documentation of those payments does exist.[103]

Landis also maintains that he witnessed Armstrong receiving multiple blood transfusions, and dispensing testosterone patches to his teammates on the United States Postal Service Team.[104] On May 25, 2010, The International Cycling Union disputed comments from Floyd Landis, "Due to the controversy following the statements made by Floyd Landis, the International Cycling Union wishes to stress that none of the tests revealed the presence of EPO in the samples taken from riders at the 2001 Tour of Switzerland," the UCI said in a statement. "The UCI has all the documentation to prove this fact." According to ESPN, "Landis claimed that Armstrong tested positive while winning in 2002, a timeline Armstrong himself said left him 'confused,' because he did not compete in the event in 2002."[105]

In May 2011, former Armstrong teammate Tyler Hamilton told CBS News that he and Armstrong had together taken EPO before and during the 1999, 2000, and 2001 Tours de France. Armstrong's attorney, Mark Fabiani, responded that Hamilton was lying.[106] The accompanying 60 Minutes investigation alleged that two other former Armstrong teammates, Frankie Andreu and George Hincapie, have told federal investigators that they witnessed Armstrong taking banned substances, including EPO, or supplied Armstrong with such substances.[106]

Fabiani stated in response that, "We have no way of knowing what happened in the grand jury and so can't comment on these anonymously sourced reports."[107] Hamilton further claimed that Armstrong tested positive for EPO during the 2001 Tour de Suisse; 60 Minutes reported that the Union Cycliste Internationale intervened to conceal those test results, and that donations from Armstrong totaling US$125,000 may have played into said actions.[106]

Martial Saugy, chief of the Swiss anti-doping agency, later confirmed that they found four urine samples suspicious of EPO use at the 2001 race, but said there was no "positive test" and claimed not to know whether the suspicious results belonged to Armstrong. As a result, Armstrong's lawyers demanded an apology from 60 Minutes.[108] Instead of apologizing, CBS News chairman Jeff Fager said CBS News stands by its report as "truthful, accurate and fair", and added that the suspicious tests which Saugy confirmed to exist have been linked to Armstrong "by a number of international officials".[109]

On February 2, 2012, U.S. federal prosecutors officially dropped their criminal investigation with no charges.[110] The closing of the case by US Attorney André Birotte Jr. was not without controversy with the decision coming as a surprise to many.[111] In October, 2012, Velonews announced they had filed a freedom of information request regarding the two-year federal Armstrong investigation and its dismissal[112]

USADA Investigation 2011–2012

In June 2012, the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) accused Armstrong of doping and trafficking of drugs, based on blood samples from 2009 and 2010, and testimonies from witnesses including former teammates.[113] Armstrong, denying all doping use in a statement,[114][115] was suspended from competition in cycling and triathlon.[116][117] Armstrong was charged in a letter from USADA, along with five others including former team manager Johan Bruyneel.[118] USADA said Armstrong used banned substances, including the blood-booster EPO and steroids, as well as blood transfusions dating back to 1996.[119]

Activity leading to August decision

In July 2012, Armstrong filed a lawsuit in the Texas Court requesting that the court "bar USADA from pursuing its case or issuing any sanctions against him" based on the claim that "USADA rules violate athletes' constitutional rights to a fair trial, and that the agency does not have jurisdiction in his case.". On July 10, 2012, after the initial lawsuit was dismissed for being overly lengthy, Armstrong filed a revised lawsuit.[120] The same day, USADA announced lifetime bans against three of his former U.S. Postal Service cycling team associates: Luis Garcia del Moral, a team doctor, Michele Ferrari, a consulting doctor, and Jose "Pepe" Marti, team trainer.[121]

U.S. District Judge Sam Sparks issued his ruling on August 20, 2012.[122] He ruled in favor of USADA. However he questioned the timing and motivation of USADA's investigation of Armstrong, and their apparent "single minded determination to force Armstrong to arbitrate" but also noting "in direct conflict with UCI's equally evident desire not to proceed against him". Applying rational basis review to the Federal Arbitration Act, the Stevens Amateur Sports Act, and various governing documents of USADA, USOC, and U.S. Cycling, Sparks upheld USADA's authority to investigate Armstrong and initiate arbitration against him, and that Armstrong's right to due process could not be violated by USADA before any proceedings had actually occurred.[123]

Four days after Judge Sparks decision, on August 24, 2012, USADA stripped Armstrong of all competitive results from August 1, 1998 to present. USADA also issued a lifetime ban of Armstrong from any activity or competition for which it has jurisdiction.[124]

Three days later, Armstrong, while publicly maintaining his innocence, decided to not officially challenge the USADA sanctions. In a statement, Armstrong said that the USADA had engaged in "an unconstitutional witch hunt" based on "outlandish and heinous claims." He added that he would have been more than willing to fight the charges, what he described as USADA's "one-sided and unfair" arbitration process was not worth the toll on his foundation and his family. "There comes a point in every man's life when he has to say, 'Enough is enough.'" Armstrong said. "For me, that time is now."[125] The New York Times reported that, "according to the WADA Code", Armstrong's failure to contest such serious charges of anti-doping rules violations means that he forfeits all awards and prizes earned after August 1, 1998, including his Tour titles, and is banned from any sport that uses the World Anti-Doping Code.[125][126][127][128]

UCI response and reasoned decision

Cycling's ruling body, the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), requested on August 24, 2012, a "reasoned decision" from USADA, explaining why USADA thinks the UCI should strip Armstrong of his titles.[129][130]

On October 10, USADA published the details of its findings, in a 200-page report accompanied by over 1000 pages of supporting evidence, including 26 testimonies of which 11 were statements from former teammates.[131][132] Among those who testified were Betsy & Frankie Andreu who repeated their testimony of the 2005 SCA Promotions case, along with Floyd Landis and Tyler Hamilton who repeated allegations made over the preceding years. Statements were also taken from former teammates including George Hincapie,[133] Levi Leipheimer,[134] and Michael Barry[135] all of whom confessed to doping during their careers as well as witnessing Armstrong using performance enhancing drugs. Prior to its release, Armstrong's legal representative Tim Herman described the USADA reasoned decision as "a one-sided hatchet job -- a taxpayer-funded tabloid piece rehashing old, disproved, unreliable allegations based largely on axe-grinders, serial perjurers, coerced testimony, sweetheart deals and threat-induced stories"[136]

On October 22, UCI announced that it would not appeal USADA's recommendations to the Court of Arbitration for Sport, meaning that it accepted USADA's recommended sanctions of banning Armstrong for life and stripping him of all his titles since August 1, 1998, including all his Tour de France titles.[137] UCI's president Pat McQuaid remarked that "Armstrong has no place in cycling. He deserves to be forgotten."[10]

A day after the UCI decision, Armstrong deleted references to his Tour wins from his Twitter biography.[138]

On November 2, 2012, WADA confirmed that it would not appeal the USADA decision.[139]

Other reactions

The French Cycling Federation (FFC) issued a statement on August 30, 2012, in support of the USADA decision, stating that "Armstrong's refusal to contest USADA's accusations sounds like an admission of his guilt with regards to breaches of anti-doping regulation." The FFC also announced they do not want vacated positions to be reassigned and want "...reimbursement of Lance Armstrong's prizes obtained during the Tour de France and other competitions for an amount assessed at 2.95 million Euros for the development of cycling among the youth and the prevention of doping."[140]

The president of the World Anti Doping Agency (WADA), John Fahey, stated the he believed Armstrong's decision not to contest the USADA's claims pursuant to its process indicated there was "substance to those charges".[141]

Robert Boland, professor of sports management at New York University, believed that Armstrong's marketing potential was still strong after the USADA's decision, stating Armstrong's "story has not been diminished. Here's a guy who essentially was at death's door with cancer and came back. That example still makes him very compelling."[142]

Some cyclists have supported Armstrong. Spain's Fernando Escartin, who placed third in the 1999 Tour de France, stated "Lance Armstrong remains the 1999 Tour winner, second Zulle and third, me... It's 13 years now since this all happened. It seems completely illogical and unreal. I don't want to even think about it."[142]

Armstrong resigned as director of the Lance Armstrong Foundation and was dropped by sponsors RadioShack[143] and Nike on 17 October 2012.[144] Anheuser-Busch the same day said it would not renew its relationship with Armstrong at the end of 2012, but will continue to support the racer's cancer charity.[145] Other sponsors who cut ties with Armstrong on that day were Trek Bicycle Corporation, Giro, FRS Healthy Performance, Honey Stinger and 24 Hour Fitness.[146] On 19 October, bicycle parts manufacturer SRAM terminated the business relationship,[147] while Oakley severed its ties on 22 October.[148]

It was announced on 30 October that Armstrong was stripped of the key to Adelaide, which he had received as an honor for his three participations in the Tour Down Under.[149] At the end of November 2012, Armstrong was elected as the top "Anti-Sportsman of the year" by Sports Illustrated.[150]

Armstrong chooses not to appeal to CAS

After UCI's formal notification to Armstrong about their decision to back the USADA decision on December 6, 2012, Armstrong had 21 days to appeal the decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. According to L'Equipe, CAS indicated that Armstrong had made no appeal by the evening of December 27th, so the final deadline to appeal had passed.[5]

Possible admission

On January 4, 2013, the New York Times reported that Armstrong had told associates and antidoping officials that he was considering publicly admitting having used banned performance-enhancing drugs and blood transfusions during his cycling career.[6] Armstrong's attorney, Tim Herman, denied the report that he has decided to admit to doping charges and told The Associated Press: "When, and if, Lance has something to say, there won't be any secret about it."[151] In a follow-up article on January 12, the New York Times reported that Armstrong would offer a "limited confession" to Oprah Winfrey in a television interview due to air on January 17. The limited confession reportedly would be done with the goal of mitigating punishments Armstrong has received that have prohibited him from participating in competitive athletic events.[152]

On January 14, 2013, it was reported that Armstrong made an apology to the Livestrong staff prior to his interview with Oprah Winfrey.[153]

Outside of cycling

In 1997, Armstrong founded the Lance Armstrong Foundation, which supports people affected by cancer. The foundation raises awareness of cancer and has raised[154] more than $325 million from the sale of yellow Livestrong bracelets.[155] During his first retirement beginning after the 2005 season, he also maintained other interests. He was the pace car driver of the Chevrolet Corvette Z06 for the 2006 Indianapolis 500.

In 2007, Armstrong with Andre Agassi, Muhammad Ali, Warrick Dunn, Jeff Gordon, Mia Hamm, Tony Hawk, Andrea Jaeger, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Mario Lemieux, Alonzo Mourning, and Cal Ripken, Jr. founded Athletes for Hope, a charity that helps professional athletes become involved in charitable causes and aims to inspire non-athletes to volunteer and support the community.[156]

In August 2009, Armstrong headlined the inaugural charity ride "Pelotonia" in Columbus, Ohio, riding over 100 miles on Saturday with the large group of cyclists. He addressed the riders the Friday evening before the two-day ride and helped the ride raise millions for cancer research.[157]

Marathons

Armstrong ran the 2006 New York City Marathon with two friends. With Nike, he assembled a pace team of Alberto Salazar, Joan Benoit Samuelson, and Hicham El Guerrouj to help him reach 3 hours. He finished in 2h 59m 36s, in 856th place. He said the race was extremely difficult compared to the Tour de France.[158] The NYC Marathon had a dedicated camera on Armstrong throughout the event which, according to Armstrong, pushed him to continue through points in which he would have normally "stopped and stretched".[159] He also helped raise $600,000 for his LiveStrong campaign during the run.

Armstrong ran the 2007 NYC Marathon in 2h 46m 43s, finishing 232nd.[160] On April 21, 2008, he ran the Boston Marathon in 2h 50m 58s, finishing in the top 500.[161]

Triathlon

Armstrong made his return to triathlon in the inaugural Ironman 70.3 Panama race, on February 12, 2012. He raced in the professional category, finishing with a time of 3:50:55, second overall to Bevan Docherty.[162] Armstrong's splits were 19:22 for the 1.2-mile swim, 2:10:18 for the 56-mile bike ride, and 1:17:01 for the run.[163] He also entered half-Ironman distance races in Texas (7th)[164] and St. Croix (3rd)[165] before breaking through with victories at Ironman 70.3 Florida and Ironman 70.3 Hawaii in overall times of 3:45:38[166] and 3:50:58,[167] respectively.

Politics President George W. Bush and Armstrong mountain biking at the president's Prairie Chapel Ranch.

In The New York Times, teammate George Hincapie hinted that Armstrong would run for Governor of Texas after cycling. In the July 2005 issue of Outside magazine, Armstrong hinted at running for governor, although "not in '06".[168] Armstrong and former president George W. Bush, a Republican and fellow Texan, call themselves friends. Bush called Armstrong in France to congratulate him after his 2005 victory in August 2005, The Times reported the President had invited Armstrong to his Prairie Chapel Ranch to go mountain biking.[169] In a 2003 interview with The Observer, Armstrong said: "He's a personal friend, but we've all got the right not to agree with our friends."[170]

In August 2005, Armstrong hinted he had changed his mind about politics. In an interview with Charlie Rose on PBS on August 1, 2005, Armstrong pointed out that running for governor would require the commitment that led him to retire from cycling. Also, in August 2005, Armstrong said that he was no longer considering politics:

The biggest problem with politics or running for the governor—the governor's race here in Austin or in Texas—is that it would mimic exactly what I've done: a ton of stress and a ton of time away from my kids. Why would I want to go from pro cycling, which is stressful and a lot of time away, straight into politics? —[171]

Armstrong was co-chair of a California campaign committee to pass the California Cancer Research Act, a ballot measure defeated by California voters on June 5, 2012.[172] Had it passed, the measure was projected to generate over $500 million annually for cancer research, smoking-cessation programs and tobacco law-enforcement by levying a $1-per-pack tax on tobacco products in California.[173]

Palmares 1991 1st Junior National Road Race Champion 1992 1st Stage 6 Settimana Bergamasca 1st Stage 4a Vuelta a Galicia 1st Stage 2 Trittico Premondiale 1st First Union Grand Prix 1st Overall Fitchburg-Longsjo Classic 1st Stage 2 2nd Züri-Metzgete 1993 1st World Road Race Champion UCI Road World Championships 1st US National Road Race Champion 1st Stage 8 Tour de France 1st Overall Tour of America 1st Trofeo Laigueglia 1st Thrift Drug Classic 1st Overall Kmart West Virginia Classic 1st Prologue & Stage 1 2nd Overall Tour du Pont 1st Stage 5 3rd Overall Tour of Sweden 1st Stage 3 1994 1st Thrift Drug Classic 1st Stage 7 Tour du Pont 2nd Liège–Bastogne–Liège 2nd Clásica de San Sebastián 1995 1st Clásica de San Sebastián 1st Stage 5 Paris–Nice 1st Overall Tour du Pont 1st Mountains Classifaction 1st Stages 4, 5 & 9 1st Overall Kmart West Virginia Classic 1st Stage 4 36th Overall Tour De France 1st Stage 18 1996 1st Overall Tour du Pont 1st Stages 2, 3b, 5, 6 & 12 1st La Flèche Wallonne 2nd Liège–Bastogne–Liège 2nd Overall Paris–Nice 1998 1st Sprint 56K Criterium 1st Overall Rheinland-Pfalz Rundfahrt 1st Overall Tour de Luxembourg 1st Stage 1 1st Cascade Cycling Classic Voided results from August 1998 onward[174]  4th Overall Vuelta a España 1999 1st Tour de France 1st Prologue 1st Stages 8, 9 & 19 1st Prologue Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré 1st Stage 4 Route du Sud 1st Stage 4 ITT Circuit de la Sarthe 2nd Amstel Gold Race 2000 1st Tour de France 1st Stage 19 ITT 1st GP des Nations 1st Grand Prix Eddy Merckx 1st Stage 3 ITT Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré 2001 1st Overall Tour de France 1st Stages 10, 11, 13 & 18 1st Overall Tour de Suisse 1st Stages 1 & 8 2nd Amstel Gold Race 2002 1st Overall Tour de France 1st Prologue 1st Stages 11, 12 & 19 1st Overall Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré 1st Stage 6 1st Overall GP du Midi Libre 1st Profronde van Stiphout 2003 1st Overall Tour de France 1st Stages 4 TTT & 15 1st Overall Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré 1st Stage 3 ITT 2004 1st Overall Tour de France 1st Stages 4 TTT, 13, 15, 16 ITT, 17 & 19 ITT 1st Overall Tour de Georgia 1st Stages 3 & 4 1st Stage 5 Tour du Languedoc-Roussillon 1st Stage 4 ITT Volta ao Algarve 1st Profronde van Stiphout 2005 1st Overall Tour de France 1st Stages 4 TTT & 20 ITT 1st Points Classification Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré 2008 2nd Leadville Trail 100 Mountain Bike Race 1st 12 Hours of Snowmass 1st Individual Time Trial Tour de Gruene 1st TTT Tour de Gruene 2009 1st Nevada City Classic 1st Colorado Pro Cross-Country Championships 1st Leadville Trail 100 Mountain Bike Race 2nd Overall Tour of the Gila 3rd Overall Tour de France 1st Stage 4 TTT 11th Overall Giro d'Italia 2010 2nd Overall Tour de Suisse 3rd Overall Tour de Luxembourg 7th Overall Vuelta a Murcia 23rd Overall Tour De France 2000 3rd Individual Time Trial 2000 Summer Olympics Triathlon & Ironman 2011 5th XTERRA USA Championships 2012 1st Ironman 70.3 Hawaii 1st Ironman 70.3 Florida 3rd Ironman 70.3 St. Croix 7th Ironman 70.3 Texas 2nd Ironman 70.3 Panama 2nd Power of Four Mountain Bike Race Grand Tours overall classification results timeline Grand Tour 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2009 2010 Vuelta - - - - -  4  - - - - - - - - - Giro - - - - - - - - - - - - - 11 - Tour WD WD 36 WD - - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 23

WD = Withdrew;
voided results struck through

Filmography

Armstrong appeared as himself in the following films:

Road to Paris (2001), documentary DodgeBall: A True Underdog Story (2004), cameo appearance You, Me and Dupree (2006), cameo appearance Accolades

Note: Awards below marked with a strike through have been rescinded.

United States Olympic Committee (USOC) SportsMan of the Year (1999, 2001, 2002, 2003)[175] Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year (2002, 2003, 2004, 2005)[176] World's Most Outstanding Athlete Award, Jesse Owens International Trophy (2000)[177][178] Reuters Sportsman of the Year (2003)[179] Prince of Asturias Award in Sports (2000)[180] Sports Ethics Fellows by the Institute for International Sport (2003)[181] Laureus World Sports Award for Sportsman of the Year (2003)[182] Laureus World Sports Award for Comeback of the Year (2000)[183] Trophee de L'Academie des Sport [France] (2004)[184] Vélo d'Or Award by Velo magazine in France (1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004)[185] Mendrisio d'Or Award in Switzerland (1999)[importance?][186] Premio Coppi-Bici d'Oro Trophy by the Fausto Coppi foundation in conjunction with La Gazzetta dello Sport (1999, 2000) Marca Legend Award by Marca, a Spanish sports daily in Madrid (2004) BBC Overseas Sports Personality of the Year Award (2003)[187] ESPY Award for Best Male Athlete (2003, 2004, 2005, 2006) ESPY Award for GMC Professional Grade Play Award (2005) ESPY Award for Best Comeback Athlete (2000) ESPN/Intersport's ARETE Award for Courage in Sport (Professional Division) (1999)[188] ABC's Wide World of Sports Athlete of the Year (1999) Favorite Athlete award at Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards (2006)[189] Presidential Delegation to the XIX Olympic Winter Games (2002)[190] Sports Illustrated magazine's Sportsman of the Year (2002)[191] VeloNews magazine's International Cyclist of the Year (2000, 2001, 2003, 2004) VeloNews magazine's North American Male Cyclist of the Year (1993, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2002, 2005) William Hill Sports Book of the Year: It's Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life (2000)[192] Triathlon magazine's Rookie of the Year (1988) Pace car driver for the Indianapolis 500 (2006)[193][194] An asteroid, 1994 JE9 was named 12373 Lancearmstrong in honor of him.[195] Six-mile Lance Armstrong Bikeway through downtown Austin, Texas, built by the city of Austin at a cost of $3.2 million.[196][197][198] Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters, Tufts University (2006)[199] Mildred "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias Courage Award presented by the United States Sports Academy (1999)[200] Key to the city of Adelaide, the capital of South Australia (2012)[201][202] See also Cycling records Doping in the United States List of doping cases in cycling Doping in sport References ^ [1][dead link] ^ Lance Armstrong, Sally Jenkins: Every Second Counts, Chapter 1, (ISBN 0-385-50871-9), Broadway Books 2003. ^ a b "Tour de France 2009 - Rider -22- Lance ARMSTRONG". Letour.fr. http://www.letour.fr/2009/TDF/RIDERS/us/coureurs/22.html. Retrieved 2012-11-10. ^ "Lance Armstrong Receives Lifetime Ban And Disqualification Of Competitive Results For Doping Violations Stemming From His Involvement In The United States Postal Service Pro-Cycling Team Doping Conspiracy, USADA". Usada.org. http://www.usada.org/media/sanction-armstrong8242012. Retrieved 2012-11-10. ^ a b Shane Stokes (2012-12-29). "Armstrong’s CAS inaction means he loses chance of appeal against doping sanctions". Velonation.com. http://www.velonation.com/News/ID/13587/Armstrongs-CAS-inaction-means-he-loses-chance-of-appeal-against-doping-sanctions.aspx. Retrieved 2013-01-02. ^ a b "In Reversal, Armstrong Is Said to Weigh Admitting Drug Use". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/05/sports/cycling/lance-armstrong-said-to-weigh-admission-of-doping.html?emc=na&_r=0. Retrieved 5 January 2013. ^ "Atty. denies report Lance Armstrong will admit doping". 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"Lance to Drug Tester: Your Papers, Please". The Wall Street Journal. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123915747307299985.html ^ "Armstrong outraged by French misbehaviour claims". Agence France-Presse. April 7, 2009. http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gpWQTJmkqpByIaAMzL_-ZAO8qiKg. Retrieved September 28, 2009 ^ An Interview With Dr. Michele Ferrari, part two, 2003, Tim Maloney / Cyclingnews European Editor ^ "Drugs issue refuses to go away due to winner's Ferrari links" The Guardian ^ "Disappointed Armstrong cuts ties with Ferrari after conviction" The Times ^ Associated Press, "Lance has suspicious ties: source", Japan Times, April 17, 2011, p. 17. ^ Laura Weislo (2011-09-25). "USADA: Lance Armstrong Paid Ferrari More Than $1 Million". Cyclingnews.com. http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/usada-lance-armstrong-paid-ferrari-more-than-dollar-1-million. Retrieved 2012-11-10. ^ "Stop strong-arm tactics". Scotsman.com. 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VeloNews. http://velonews.competitor.com/2005/08/news/litke-suspicion-remains-lances-opponent_8749. Retrieved July 23, 2012. ^ "California Western Alumni Professional News". California Western School of Law. http://www.cwsl.edu/main/default.asp?nav=alumni.asp&body=alumni/AlumProfessionalNews.asp. Retrieved January 9, 2008. ^ "Armstrong cleared in drug inquiry". BBC. May 31, 2006. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/other_sports/cycling/5033672.stm. Retrieved January 9, 2008. ^ "UCI report clears Armstrong". VeloNews. Associated Press. May 31, 2006. Archived from the original on December 30, 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20071230103550/http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/9932.0.html. Retrieved January 9, 2008. ^ Max, Arthur (May 31, 2006). "Report Exonorates Armstrong of Doping". San Francisco Chronicle. Associated Press. 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Retrieved 2012-11-10. ^ http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/university-rescinds-honorary-degree-awarded-lance-armstrong_663723.html ^ "Mildred "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias Courage Award". http://www.asama.org/awards-of-sport/medallion-series/courage/. Retrieved August 28, 2012. ^ Higgins, Alice (2012-10-23). "Adelaide Lord Mayor Stephen Yarwood says Lance Armstrong can keep keys to the city". The Australian. http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/adelaide-lord-mayor-stephen-yarwood-says-lance-armstrong-can-keep-keys-to-city/story-e6frg6n6-1226501860714. Retrieved 2013-01-03. ^ "Lance Armstrong loses Keys to City of Adelaide". News Corporation. 2012-10-31. http://www.news.com.au/sport/more-sport/lance-armstrong-loses-key-to-city-of-adelaide/story-fndukor0-1226507115747. Retrieved 2013-01-03. Further reading Lance Armstrong, Sally Jenkins: It's Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life (ISBN 0-425-17961-3), Putnam 2000. Lance Armstrong, Sally Jenkins: Every Second Counts (ISBN 0-385-50871-9), Broadway Books 2003. Linda Armstrong Kelly, Joni Rodgers: No Mountain High Enough: Raising Lance, Raising Me (ISBN 0-7679-1855-X), Broadway Books 2002. Daniel Coyle: Lance Armstrong's War: One Man's Battle Against Fate, Fame, Love, Death, Scandal, and a Few Other Rivals on the Road to the Tour De France (ISBN 0-06-073497-3), Harper Collins 2005. Pierre Ballester, David Walsh: L. A. Confidentiel: Les secrets de Lance Armstrong (ISBN 2-84675-130-7), La Martinière (French). Various circumstantial evidence regarding Armstrong doping. Pierre Ballester, David Walsh: L.A. Officiel (ISBN 2-84675-204-4), La Martinière (French). Sharon Cook, Graciela Sholander: Dream It Do It: Inspiring Stories of Dreams Come True (ISBN 1-884587-30-5), Planning/Communications 2004. John Wilcockson: 23 Days in July (ISBN 0-7195-6717-3), John Murray 2004. John Wilcockson: The 2005 Tour De France: The Last Chapter of the Armstrong Era (ISBN 1-931382-68-9), Velo Press 2005. John Wilcokson: LANCE: The Making of the World's Greatest Champion (ISBN 9780306815874), Da Capo Press 2009. External links Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Lance Armstrong Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Lance Armstrong USADA - U.S. Postal Service Pro Cycling Team Investigation - Reasoned Decision Official website The Lance Armstrong Foundation Lance Armstrong profile at Cycling Archives Lance Armstrong at the Internet Movie Database Kimmage, Paul. "Tour gears up for return of Lance Armstrong", The Sunday Times, July 5, 2009. Awards and achievements Preceded by
Derek Birley William Hill Sports Book of the Year winner
2000 Succeeded by
Laura Hillenbrand Preceded by
Jonny Mosely
Rulon Gardner USOC Sportsman of the Year
1999
2001–2003 Succeeded by
Rulon Gardner
Michael Phelps Preceded by
Steffi Graf Prince of Asturias Award for Sports
2000 Succeeded by
Manuel Estiarte v t e UCI Road World Champions – Men's road race 1927 Alfredo Binda 1928–1929 Georges Ronsse 1930 Alfredo Binda 1931 Learco Guerra 1932 Alfredo Binda 1933 Georges Speicher 1934 Karel Kaers 1935 Jean Aerts 1936 Antonin Magne 1937 Éloi Meulenberg 1938 Marcel Kint 1946 Hans Knecht 1947 Theo Middelkamp 1948 Briek Schotte 1949 Rik Van Steenbergen 1950 Briek Schotte 1951 Ferdi Kübler 1952 Heinz Müller 1953 Fausto Coppi 1954 Louison Bobet 1955 Stan Ockers 1956–1957 Rik Van Steenbergen 1958 Ercole Baldini 1959 André Darrigade 1960–1961 Rik Van Looy 1962 Jean Stablinski 1963 Benoni Beheyt 1964 Jan Janssen 1965 Tom Simpson 1966 Rudi Altig 1967 Eddy Merckx 1968 Vittorio Adorni 1969 Harm Ottenbros 1970 Jean-Pierre Monseré 1971 Eddy Merckx 1972 Marino Basso 1973 Felice Gimondi 1974 Eddy Merckx 1975 Hennie Kuiper 1976 Freddy Maertens 1977 Francesco Moser 1978 Gerrie Knetemann 1979 Jan Raas 1980 Bernard Hinault 1981 Freddy Maertens 1982 Giuseppe Saronni 1983 Greg LeMond 1984 Claude Criquielion 1985 Joop Zoetemelk 1986 Moreno Argentin 1987 Stephen Roche 1988 Maurizio Fondriest 1989 Greg LeMond 1990 Rudy Dhaenens 1991–1992 Gianni Bugno 1993 Lance Armstrong 1994 Luc Leblanc 1995 Abraham Olano 1996 Johan Museeuw 1997 Laurent Brochard 1998 Oscar Camenzind 1999 Óscar Freire 2000 Romāns Vainšteins 2001 Óscar Freire 2002 Mario Cipollini 2003 Igor Astarloa 2004 Óscar Freire 2005 Tom Boonen 2006–2007 Paolo Bettini 2008 Alessandro Ballan 2009 Cadel Evans 2010 Thor Hushovd 2011 Mark Cavendish 2012 Philippe Gilbert v t e Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year 1931: Pepper Martin 1932: Gene Sarazen 1933: Carl Hubbell 1934: Dizzy Dean 1935: Joe Louis 1936: Jesse Owens 1937: Don Budge 1938: Don Budge 1939: Nile Kinnick 1940: Tom Harmon 1941: Joe DiMaggio 1942: Frank Sinkwich 1943: Gunder Hägg 1944: Byron Nelson 1945: Byron Nelson 1946: Glenn Davis 1947: Johnny Lujack 1948: Lou Boudreau 1949: Leon Hart 1950: Jim Konstanty 1951: Dick Kazmaier 1952: Bob Mathias 1953: Ben Hogan 1954: Willie Mays 1955: Howard Cassady 1956: Mickey Mantle 1957: Ted Williams 1958: Herb Elliot 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Rafer Johnson 1961: Roger Maris 1962: Maury Wills 1963: Sandy Koufax 1964: Don Schollander 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Frank Robinson 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Denny McLain 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: George Blanda 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Mark Spitz 1973: O. J. Simpson 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Fred Lynn 1976: Bruce Jenner 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Ron Guidry 1979: Willie Stargell 1980: U.S. Olympic Hockey Team 1981: John McEnroe 1982: Wayne Gretzky 1983: Carl Lewis 1984: Carl Lewis 1985: Dwight Gooden 1986: Larry Bird 1987: Ben Johnson 1988: Orel Hershiser 1989: Joe Montana 1990: Joe Montana 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Michael Jordan 1993: Michael Jordan 1994: George Foreman 1995: Cal Ripken, Jr. 1996: Michael Johnson 1997: Tiger Woods 1998: Mark McGwire 1999: Tiger Woods 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Barry Bonds 2002: Lance Armstrong 2003: Lance Armstrong 2004: Lance Armstrong 2005: Lance Armstrong 2006: Tiger Woods 2007: Tom Brady 2008: Michael Phelps 2009: Jimmie Johnson 2010: Drew Brees 2011: Aaron Rodgers 2012: Michael Phelps v t e Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year 1954: Roger Bannister 1955: Johnny Podres 1956: Bobby Morrow 1957: Stan Musial 1958: Rafer Johnson 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Arnold Palmer 1961: Jerry Lucas 1962: Terry Baker 1963: Pete Rozelle 1964: Ken Venturi 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Jim Ryun 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Bill Russell 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: Bobby Orr 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Billie Jean King & John Wooden 1973: Jackie Stewart 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Pete Rose 1976: Chris Evert 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Jack Nicklaus 1979: Terry Bradshaw & Willie Stargell 1980: U.S. Olympic Hockey Team 1981: Sugar Ray Leonard 1982: Wayne Gretzky 1983: Mary Decker 1984: Edwin Moses & Mary Lou Retton 1985: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 1986: Joe Paterno 1987: Bob Bourne, Judi Brown King, Kipchoge Keino, Dale Murphy, Chip Rives, Patty Sheehan, Rory Sparrow, & Reggie Williams 1988: Orel Hershiser 1989: Greg LeMond 1990: Joe Montana 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Arthur Ashe 1993: Don Shula 1994: Bonnie Blair & Johann Olav Koss 1995: Cal Ripken, Jr. 1996: Tiger Woods 1997: Dean Smith 1998: Mark McGwire & Sammy Sosa 1999: U.S. Women's Soccer Team 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Curt Schilling & Randy Johnson 2002: Lance Armstrong 2003: David Robinson & Tim Duncan 2004: Boston Red Sox 2005: Tom Brady 2006: Dwyane Wade 2007: Brett Favre 2008: Michael Phelps 2009: Derek Jeter 2010: Drew Brees 2011: Mike Krzyzewski & Pat Summitt 2012: LeBron James v t e Laureus World Sportsman of the Year 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Tiger Woods 2002: Michael Schumacher 2003: Lance Armstrong 2004: Michael Schumacher 2005: Roger Federer 2006: Roger Federer 2007: Roger Federer 2008: Roger Federer 2009: Usain Bolt 2010: Usain Bolt 2011: Rafael Nadal 2012: Novak Djokovic v t e ESPY Awards Cross-cutter Courage Female Athlete Male Athlete Breakthrough Athlete Championship Performance Coach/Manager Female College Athlete Male College Athlete College Program Comeback Athlete Female Athlete with a Disability Male Athlete with a Disability Male U.S. Olympian Female U.S. Olympian Game Performance Under Pressure Perseverance Upset Moment Play Record-Breaking Performance Movie Team Individual Female Action Male Action Bowler Driver Fighter Female Golfer Male Golfer Jockey MLS MLB NBA NFL NHL Female Tennis Male Tennis Track and Field WNBA Discontinued Action Soccer Female Soccer Male Soccer U.S. Olympian Male College Basketball Female College Basketball College Football Disabled Angler Boxer Golfer International Athlete Female Track Male Track Outdoor Sportsman Hosts Dennis Miller (1993) Dennis Miller (1994) John Goodman (1995) Tony Danza (1996) Jeff Foxworthy (1997) Norm Macdonald (1998) Samuel L. 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ceremonies 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 v t e Vélo d'Or Winners 1992: Indurain 1993: Indurain 1994: Rominger 1995: Jalabert 1996: Museeuw 1997: Ullrich 1998: Pantani 1999: Armstrong 2000: Armstrong 2001: Armstrong 2002: Cipollini 2003: Armstrong 2004: Armstrong 2005: Boonen 2006: Bettini 2007: Contador 2008: Contador 2009: Contador 2010: Cancellara 2011: Gilbert 2012: Wiggins Authority control WorldCat VIAF: 19845402 LCCN: n96026176 GND: 122191552 LIBRIS: 316370 Persondata Name Armstrong, Lance Edward Alternative names Short description American professional road racing cyclist Date of birth September 18, 1971 Place of birth Dallas, Texas Date of death Place of death Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lance_Armstrong&oldid=533330206" Categories: Lance Armstrong1971 birthsAmerican adopteesAmerican agnosticsAmerican cycling road race championsAmerican cyclistsAmerican health activistsAmerican sportspeople in doping casesAmerican Tour de France stage winnersCyclists at the 1992 Summer OlympicsCyclists at the 1996 Summer OlympicsCyclists at the 2000 Summer OlympicsDoping cases in cyclingFounders of non-governmental organizationsLaureus World Sports Awards winnersLiving peopleMale cyclistsOlympic bronze medalists for the United StatesOlympic cyclists of the United StatesOlympic medalists in cyclingSportspeople from Austin, TexasSportspeople from Dallas, TexasSportspeople from Plano, TexasTesticular cancer survivorsUCI World ChampionsHidden categories: All articles with dead external linksArticles with dead external links from November 2012Articles with dead external links from July 2010Articles with dead external links from September 2012Wikipedia indefinitely move-protected pagesWikipedia temporarily semi-protected biographies of living peopleArticles with French language external linksWikipedia articles with authority control information Navigation menu Personal tools Create accountLog in Namespaces Article Talk Variants Views Read View source View history Actions Search Navigation Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact Wikipedia Toolbox What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Permanent link Page information Cite this page Print/export Create a bookDownload as PDFPrintable version Languages Afrikaans Alemannisch العربية বাংলা Bân-lâm-gú Беларуская Беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎ Български Brezhoneg Català Česky Cymraeg Dansk Deutsch Eesti Ελληνικά Español Esperanto Euskara فارسی Français Frysk Galego 한국어 Hrvatski Ido Bahasa Indonesia Íslenska Italiano עברית Basa Jawa Kapampangan ქართული Қазақша Latina Latviešu Lëtzebuergesch Lietuvių Limburgs Magyar Македонски മലയാളം मराठी Bahasa Melayu Монгол Nederlands 日本語 Norsk (bokmål)‎ Norsk (nynorsk)‎ Occitan Plattdüütsch Polski Português Română Русский Sicilianu සිංහල Simple English Slovenčina Slovenščina Српски / srpski Srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски Suomi Svenska தமிழ் ไทย Türkçe Українська Tiếng Việt West-Vlams Winaray 中文 This page was last modified on 16 January 2013 at 06:46.
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Reports: Armstrong admits to Oprah he cheated during cycling career - CNN.com SET EDITION:  U.S. INTERNATIONAL MÉXICO ARABIC TV:   CNN CNNi CNN en Español HLN Sign up Log in Home TV & Video CNN Trends U.S. World Politics Justice Entertainment Tech Health Living Travel Opinion iReport Money Sports Sports Bleacher Report   Sports Illustrated   Print Email More sharing Reports: Armstrong admits to Oprah he cheated during cycling career By Steve Almasy, CNN updated 11:03 AM EST, Tue January 15, 2013 STORY HIGHLIGHTS NEW: Media reports say Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs Source tells CNN the former cyclist in talks to repay some sponsorship money Interview with Winfrey lasted 2 1/2 hours, talk show queen tweets Armstrong apologizes to cancer foundation workers for their stress

Still own a Livestrong bracelet? Tell us about it.

(CNN) -- Lance Armstrong, who for years vehemently denied cheating while winning a record seven Tours de France, told Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs to advance his cycling career, according to media reports.

ABC News, the New York Times and USA Today, citing unnamed sources, reported Monday night that the former cyclist finally admitted to using steroids during an interview he and Winfrey taped Monday night in Armstrong's hometown of Austin, Texas.

Armstrong was emotional at times during the session, a source, who was familiar with the interview, told CNN.

The person refused to discuss the specifics of what Armstrong said, including whether he confessed to using performance-enhancing drugs as ABC and USA Today reported.

Cyclist Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France wins and banned from the tournament for life, the International Cycling Union announced Monday, October 22. Pictured, Armstrong addresses participants at The Livestrong Challenge Ride on Sunday. He stepped down as chairman of his Livestrong cancer charity on Wednesday, October 17. Armstrong leads his teammates during the final stage of the 1999 Tour de France. Armstrong, 17, competes in the Jeep Triathlon Grand Prix in 1988. He became a professional triathlete at age 16 and joined the U.S. National Cycling Team two years later. In 1995, Armstrong wins the 18th stage of the Tour de France. He finished 36th overall and finished the race for the first time that year. Armstrong rides for charity in May 1998 at the Ikon Ride for the Roses to benefit the Lance Armstrong Foundation. He established the foundation to benefit cancer research after being diagnosed with testicular cancer in 1996. After treatment, he was declared cancer-free in February 1997. Armstrong takes his honor lap on the Champs-Élysées in Paris after winning the Tour de France for the first time in 1999. After winning the 2000 Tour de France, Armstrong holds his son Luke on his shoulders. Armstrong rides during the 18th stage of the 2001 Tour de France. He won the tour that year for the third consecutive time. Armstrong celebrates winning the 10th stage of the Tour de France in 2001. After winning the 2001 Tour de France, Armstrong presents President George W. Bush with a U.S. Postal Service yellow jersey and a replica of the bike he used to win the race. Armstrong celebrates on the podium after winning the Tour de France by 61 seconds in 2003. It was his fifth consecutive win. Jay Leno interviews Armstrong on "The Tonight Show" in 2003. After his six consecutive Tour de France win in 2004, Armstrong attends a celebration in his honor in front of the Texas State Capitol in Austin. Armstrong arrives at the 2005 American Music Awards in Los Angeles with his then-fiancee Sheryl Crow. The couple never made it down the aisle, splitting up the following year. Armstrong holds up a paper displaying the number seven at the start of the Tour de France in 2005. He went on to win his seventh consecutive victory. As a cancer survivor, Armstrong testifies during a Senate hearing in 2008 on Capitol Hill. The hearing focused on finding a cure for cancer in the 21st century. In 2009, Armstrong suffers a broken collarbone after falling during a race in Spain along with more than a dozen other riders. Young Armstrong fans write messages on the ground using yellow chalk ahead of the 2009 Tour de France. He came in third place that year. Armstrong launches the three-day Livestrong Global Cancer Summit in 2009 in Dublin, Ireland. The event was organized by his foundation. In May 2010, Armstrong crashes during the Amgen Tour of California and is taken to the hospital. That same day, he denied allegations of doping made by former teammate Floyd Landis. Ahead of what he said would be his last Tour de France, Armstrong gears up for the start of the race in 2010. Lance Armstrong looks back as he rides in a breakaway during the 2010 Tour de France. Armstrong finishes 23rd in the 2010 Tour de France. He announced his retirement from the world of professional cycling in February 2011. He said he wants to devote more time to his family and the fight against cancer. Armstrong's son Luke; twin daughters, Isabelle and Grace; and 1-year-old son, Max, stand outside the Radioshack team bus on a rest day during the 2010 Tour de France. The frame of Armstrong's bike is engraved with the names of his four children at the time and the Spanish word for five, "cinco." His fifth child, Olivia, was born in October 2010. In February 2012, Armstrong competes in the 70.3 Ironman Triathlon in Panama City. He went on to claim two Half Ironman triathlon titles by June. He got back into the sport after retiring from professional cycling. Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years Lance Armstrong over the years HIDE CAPTION << < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 > >> Photos: Lance Armstrong over the years Reports: Armstrong admits steroid use McKinnon: Armstrong doping 'devastating' Report: Armstrong says he used drugs Armstrong could face more legal trouble

Armstrong also might pay back part of the money he received from the U.S. Postal Service, which sponsored the cyclist and his team while he was winning six of his Tours de France, the source said.

The source said Armstrong was in negotiations to repay some of the money.

ESPN reported in 2011 that the agency -- which is not taxpayer funded -- paid more that $31 million to sponsor the team during the final four years of its agreement.

A spokeswoman for the postal service said: "We are not in a position now to discuss any of the legal issues associated with these developments and the prior relationship between the U.S. Postal Service and Mr. Armstrong, but we will do so at an appropriate time."

Armstrong won the Tour de France a record seven straight years, beginning in 1999. The postal service sponsored the team from 1996 to 2004.

Tim Herman, one of Armstrong's lawyers, had no comment about the interview.

Winfrey tweeted after the interview: "Just wrapped with @lancearmstrong More than 2 1/2 hours . He came READY!" The interview will be edited down to 90 minutes, Winfrey has said.

"We are not confirming any specific details regarding the interview at this time," a spokesperson for OWN said Monday night.

The disgraced cycling legend earlier apologized to the staff of the cancer charity he started, a publicist for Livestrong Foundation said.

Armstrong was tearful during the 15-minute meeting and didn't address the issue of steroid use in cycling, Rae Bazzarre, director of communications for the foundation, said.

Bazzarre added that Armstrong offered to the staff a "sincere and heartfelt apology for the stress they've endured because of him."

He urged them to keep working hard to help cancer survivors and their families.

Armstrong's sit-down in his hometown of Austin, Texas, with Winfrey was his first interview since he was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles in October in a blood-doping scandal.

Read more: Oprah interview with Lance Armstrong airs January 17

For more than a decade, Armstrong has denied he used performance-enhancing drugs, but he was linked to a doping scandal by nearly a dozen other former cyclists who have admitted to doping.

What Armstrong said or did not say to Winfrey could have ramifications.

Some media outlets have reported that Armstrong has been strongly considering the possibility of a confession, possibly as a way to stem the tide of fleeing sponsors and as part of a long-term redemptive comeback plan.

But such a confession might lend weight to the lawsuits that could await him.

The interview will air at 9 p.m. ET Thursday on the Oprah Winfrey Network. Winfrey has promised a "no-holds-barred" interview, with no conditions and no payment made to Armstrong.

But the speculations swirled Monday.

"I don't think we're going to get an out-and-out confession," says CNN sports anchor Patrick Snell. "I think we're going to get something like, 'This is what went on during this era of trying to compete at the highest level.'"

Livestrong bracelet: To wear or not to wear?

Armstrong, 41, has repeatedly and vehemently denied that he used banned performance-enhancing drugs as well as illegal blood transfusions during his cycling career.

Winfrey will ask Armstrong to address the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's October report, which said there was overwhelming evidence he was directly involved in a sophisticated doping program, a statement from her network said last week.

The International Cycling Union, which chose not to appeal the USADA's lifetime ban, stripped Armstrong of his record seven Tour victories.

The World Anti-Doping Agency also agreed with the sanctions, which means Armstrong may not compete in sports governed by that agency's code.

Before the ban, he was competing in Ironman triathlons and had won two of the five events he had entered.

Since the ban he has entered two non-sanctioned events.

Report: Armstrong offered to donate $250,000 to anti-doping agency

Why now?

So, why would Armstrong choose to make a confession now?

"I would suspect that he sees this as certainly his best way forward," Snell says. "He would have taken strong legal advice, of course. When you look at the kind of stuff that Oprah's done over the years, it's a chance to get ... heartfelt emotions across."

The New York Times has reported that Armstrong was contemplating publicly admitting he used illegal performance-enhancing drugs. Such an admission might lead toward Armstrong regaining his eligibility.

One of his attorneys denied Armstrong was in discussion with the two anti-doping agencies.

Herman, in a recent e-mail to CNN Sports, did not address whether Armstrong told associates -- as reported by the newspaper -- that he was considering an admission.

But such an admission could open him up to lawsuits, something Armstrong is likely well aware of.

"He is surrounded by the best legal advice, the best legal team," Snell says. "It's very hard for anyone to imagine him going into this without having been fully briefed, made aware of absolutely every scenario."

Share your view on Armstrong

Drug tests

In the past, Armstrong has argued that he took more than 500 drug tests and never failed.

In its 202-page report that detailed Armstrong's alleged use of performance-enhancing drugs and blood transfusions, the USADA said it had tested Armstrong less than 60 times and the International Cycling Union conducted about 215 tests.

The agency did not say that Armstrong ever failed a test, but his former teammates testified as to how they beat tests or avoided the tests altogether.

The New York Times, citing unnamed associates and anti-doping officials, said Armstrong has been in discussions with USADA officials and hopes to meet with David Howman, chief of the World Anti-Doping Agency. The newspaper said none of the people with knowledge of Armstrong's situation wanted to be identified because it would jeopardize their access to information on the matter.

Awaiting Armstrong's 'last word'

Armstrong: The legend and the fall

Armstrong has been an icon for his cycling feats and celebrity, bringing more status to a sport wildly popular in some nations but lacking big-name recognition, big money and mass appeal in the United States.

He fought back from testicular cancer to win the Tour from 1999 to 2005. He raised millions via his Lance Armstrong Foundation to help cancer victims and survivors, an effort illustrated by trendy yellow "LiveSTRONG" wristbands that helped bring in the money.

But Armstrong has long been dogged by doping allegations, with compatriot Floyd Landis -- who was stripped of his 2006 Tour de France title after failing a drug test -- making a series of claims in 2011.

Armstrong sued the USADA last year to stop its investigation of him, arguing it did not have the right to prosecute him. But after a federal judge dismissed the case, Armstrong said he would no longer participate in the investigation.

In October 2012, Armstrong was stripped of his titles and banned from cycling. Weeks later, he stepped down from the board of his foundation, Livestrong.

Kurtz: Can even Oprah save Lance Armstrong?

CNN's Ed Lavandera, Kevin Bohn, Joe Sutton, Ed Payne, Jillian Martin and Chelsea J. Carter contributed to this report.

0 Comments » Print Email More sharing We recommend From around the web Part of complete coverage on Lance Armstrong To Armstrong's critics, doping admission would be sweet updated 1:25 PM EST, Wed January 16, 2013 They were the liars. The "trolls." The bitter, vindictive and jealous. 12 Lance Armstrong quotes to know updated 10:52 AM EST, Wed January 16, 2013 Armstrong has not only spent years vehemently denying using banned performance-enhancing drugs; he also has viciously attacked those who told what they knew about doping in the sport and implicated him in the process. Oprah interview won't reduce sanctions updated 10:49 AM EST, Wed January 16, 2013 It will take more than a television interview to reduce sanctions against Lance Armstrong, the World Anti-Doping Agency said. Public takes shots at Armstrong updated 4:27 PM EST, Tue January 15, 2013 The court of public opinion weighed in decidedly against Lance Armstrong, even before the broadcast of an interview in which he is said to acknowledge using performance-enhancing drugs after years of denials. How an all-American hero fell to earth updated 9:26 AM EST, Tue January 15, 2013 Lance Armstrong's feat of winning seven consecutive Tour de France titles was like the demigod Hercules achieving his "Twelve Labors." Armstrong loses Tour de France titles updated 3:40 PM EDT, Mon October 22, 2012 The International Cycling Union announces hat Lance Armstrong is being stripped of his seven Tour de France titles. Awaiting Armstrong's 'last word' updated 11:45 AM EST, Thu December 6, 2012 Forty days alone in the wilderness was enough for Jesus, but Lance Armstrong is facing an altogether longer period of solitude. Sponsor sad at loss of Armstrong's 'great story' updated 4:43 PM EST, Wed November 7, 2012 Lance Armstrong's fall from grace has left one of the cyclist's former sponsors not only "sad" -- but also without one of its biggest marketing tools. Armstrong asked to return Tour de France prize money updated 2:15 PM EDT, Fri October 26, 2012 Lance Armstrong has been asked to return all prize money from his seven annulled Tour de France victories by the sport's governing body. Armstrong report vindicates those who raised doping alert updated 2:57 PM EDT, Wed October 24, 2012 For years, as Lance Armstrong basked in the glow of an adoring public, his critics frequently were banished to the shadows, dismissed by the cycling legend and his coterie as cranks or worse. Doping scandal costs Armstrong updated 5:44 AM EDT, Mon October 22, 2012 For years, Lance Armstrong carried a growing burden of doping accusations up increasingly steep hills, accumulating fans, wealth and respect along the way. Evidence 'overwhelming,' agency says updated 9:57 PM EDT, Wed October 10, 2012 Cyclist Lance Armstrong was part of "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen." Doping done to 'be a good teammate' updated 5:53 PM EDT, Sat October 13, 2012 A former teammate of Lance Armstrong says there was no question why U.S. Postal Service team members doped during big races. NewsPulse Most popular stories right now JPMorgan slashes Dimon's bonus by 53% GOP balks at Obama's gun control proposals Debt ceiling: Is Social Security at risk? 21 people charged in unemployment fraud scheme Lance Armstrong: How he'll make money now Explore the news with NewsPulse » Home | Video | CNN Trends | U.S. | World | Politics | Justice | Entertainment | Tech | Health | Living | Travel | Opinion | iReport | Money | Sports Tools & widgets | RSS | Podcasts | Blogs | CNN mobile | My profile | E-mail alerts | CNN shop | Site map CNN en ESPAÑOL | CNN Chile | CNN Expansion | العربية | 한국어 | 日本語 | Türkçe CNN TV | HLN | Transcripts | © 2013 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Terms of service | Privacy guidelines | Ad choices | Advertise with us | About us | Contact us | Work for us | Help

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Raising my 5 kids. Fighting Cancer. Swim, bike, run and golf whenever I can. Met patience in 1996 but only now am I getting to know and appreciate her.

Austin, TX · mellowjohnnys.com

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